International Affairs Events in DC

Monday, June 19th

Redefining Manufacturing: The Service Sector’s Role in Boosting U.S. Competitiveness and Resilience

Time: 10:00am-11:30am

Location: The Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, 6th floor

Information: The Trump administration is looking to rebuild the U.S. manufacturing base using domestic economic and international trade policies. What is too often unnoticed is the major role that services industries play in manufacturing from the production process through distribution and aftersales maintenance of products. Services account for nearly a quarter of manufacturing input, from telecommunications to distribution and financial services, resulting in dramatic improvements in manufacturing efficiency. Smart technologies have undoubtedly raised productivity, but often overlooked is the balance of payments surplus U.S. services providers generate in the U.S. trade accounts. Coverage of services trade in U.S. trade agreements helps maintain that competitiveness. Join us for a discussion on the intersection of services and manufacturing to assess the role services play in the manufacturing process. From reducing costs to enhancing productivity, the services further manufacturers remain competitiveness on a global level, which in turn benefits the U.S. trade position. The role of services in the broader economy, as well as the role of cloud computing, and development of worker skills and training for the manufacturing sector will be discussed. This event is co-hosted by the US Department of Commerce and the Coalition of Services Industries.

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The Forgotten Flight: Terrorism, Diplomacy and the Pursuit of Justice

Time: 11:00am-12:00pm

Location: The Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW

Information: On 19 September 1989, 170 people were killed when French Airlines UTA Flight 772 was destroyed by a suitcase bomb while en route from Chad to Paris. Despite being one of the deadliest acts of terrorism in history, it remained overshadowed by the Lockerbie tragedy that had taken place ten months earlier. As a lawyer, Stuart H. Newberger represented the families of the seven Americans killed in the UTA 772 attack. Now he brings all the pieces together to tell its story for the first time, revealing in riveting prose how French investigators cracked the case and taking us inside the courtroom to witness the litigation against the Libyan state that followed. In the age of globalization, The Forgotten Flight provides a fascinating insight into the pursuit of justice across international borders.

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Losing an Enemy: Can the Iran Nuclear Deal Survive Trump?

Time: 12:00pm

Location: The Atlantic Council, 1030 15th St NW, 12th floor

Information: The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action was the product of more than a decade of negotiations initiated by three European countries in the absence of US-Iran dialogue. The talks succeeded only after the United States took a leading role and the stars aligned in Tehran and Washington with two governments determined to reach a deal. In his third book on US-Iran diplomacy, Trita Parsi details the history of those talks and the reasons for their success, as well as the challenges the agreement now faces. 

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Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS: A Special Documentary Screening

Time: 12:00pm-2:00pm

Location: The Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Ave NE, Allison Auditorium

Information: In this new 90-minute National Geographic documentary, Academy-Award nominated filmmaker Sebastian Junger and Emmy winner Nick Quested chronicle Syria’s descent into the unbridled chaos that allowed the rise of the Islamic State. Pulling from nearly 1,000 hours of visceral footage, they capture the Syrian war’sharrowing carnage, political and social consequences, and human toll,while painting an alarming picture of the West’s role in the creation of ISIS.

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U.S.-India Defense and Security Cooperation: Promise and Momentum

Time: 1:00pm-3:00pm

Location: CSIS, 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW

Information: CSIS Wadhwani Chair cordially invites you to, “U.S.-India Defense and Security Cooperation: Promise and Momentum,” a panel discussion with a senior delegation from the Delhi Policy Group. In recent years, the U.S.-India defense partnership has undergone a positive transformation.  New agreements have been forced like the “Joint Strategic Vision for the Asia Pacific and Indian Ocean Region,” and the Logistics Exchange Memorandum of Agreement (LEMOA). New cooperative programs have been created like the Defense Technology and Trade Initiative.  And our exercises have become more complex, and mission-oriented. But practical cooperation remains nascent, and progress requires strong commitments of time and resources from the leaders of both nations. Ahead of the first Modi-Trump summit later in June, we will explore the reasons underpinning the relationship, and steps both sides can take to continue recent progress.

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Launch: Toward A Global Norm Against Manipulating the Integrity of Financial Data

Time: 2:00pm-3:30pm

Location: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1779 Massachusetts Ave NW

Information: The malicious use of information and communication technologies poses a risk to financial systems and could endanger financial stability. Carnegie’s Cyber Policy Initiative invites you to the launch event of the Carnegie white paper “Toward a Global Norm Against Manipulating the Integrity of Financial Data.” Building on the March 18, 2017 communiqué of the G20 finance ministers and central bank governors, this Carnegie publication proposes that, as a next step, the G20 should commit not to manipulate the integrity of data and algorithms of financial institutions and to cooperate when such manipulations occur. This event and panel discussion will explore the implications of this proposal and the path forward should it be adopted. Michael Chertoff will give opening remarks, followed by an in-depth discussion panel featuring Greg Rattray, Siobhan MacDermott, and Tim Maurer, the report’s lead author. Duncan Hollis will moderate.

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Out Of Reach Senate Congressional Briefing

Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

Location: Russel Senate Office Building, 2 Constitution Ave NE, Room 188

Information: The National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC) invites you to join us for a Senate Congressional Briefing on NLIHC’s newest report, Out of Reach 2017: The High Cost of Housing, documents the gap between wages and the price of housing in every county and state in America. The report shows how wage stagnation – particularly among lower wage workers – combined with a significant increase in the number of renters and an inadequate supply of affordable homes has led to rising rents in every state and congressional district. Panelists will discuss the key findings of the report and federal policy solutions related to the budget, tax reform, housing finance reform, and an infrastructure package, among others. State-level data on local housing needs will be provided to attendees who RSVP.

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Naftogaz and the Future of Ukraine’s Energy Sector

Time: 3:30pm

Location: Atlantic Council, 1030 15th St NW

Information: Please join the Atlantic Council’s Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center and Global Energy Center for a conversation on the future of Ukraine’s energy sector with Naftogaz leadership. On May 31, Ukraine’s Naftogaz won a victory over Russia’s Gazprom in the international arbitration court in Stockholm. Naftogaz won on all three counts the court considered. On the heels of this extraordinary development, the Atlantic Council will bring together Naftogaz Chief Executive Officer and Chief Commercial Officer, Andriy Kobolyev and Yuriy Vitrenko, and fellow energy experts, to discuss Ukraine’s energy sector – Nord Stream 2, implications of the arbitration between Naftogaz and Gazprom in Stockholm, and energy reforms.

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Tuesday, June 20th

Enabling Policy Environments to Bridge the Skills Gap- Education for Development Workgroup Event

Time: 9:00am-10:30am

Location: Society for International Development, 1111 19th St NW, #700

Information: Often education systems and employers fail to align the skills taught in public institutions to the skills demanded in the private sector workplace. Policy environments need to be supportive to transform how education systems and labor markets act together to provide soft skills that will offer concrete pathways for disadvantaged youth worldwide. What are some examples that are trying to enable these environments? How can education systems better align curriculum and courses to prepare students to succeed professionally? What role do private sector employers play in the school-to-work pipeline, and what role does the education system play in ensuring students are thriving professionally? How can we design solutions to reduce inequality and biases related to gender, ethnicity and beyond? We hope to engage different stakeholders in a conversation around the opportunities and challenges that enable policy environments to support youth education and employability programming aimed at developing soft skills. This conversation will bring examples both from the US and overseas to compare stakeholder experiences and to share lessons learned with SID-W members. Come discuss more with like-minded development experts.

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El Salvador 25 Years After the Peace Agreement

Time: 9:30am-11:00am

Location: Inter-American Dialogue, 1155 15th St NW, Suite 800

Information: This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Chapultepec Peace Accords that brought an end to over a decade of civil war in El Salvador. The landmark agreement successfully integrated the FMLN guerrillas into political life, resulting in a functional two-party system. Recently, however, El Salvador has seen heightened political polarization and a troubled economy. The country has also struggled with persistently high rates of crime and violence, ongoing emigration, organized criminal gangs known as maras, difficulties reforming the government, and—more recently—serious allegations of corruption. For this open discussion on El Salvador’s challenges and, more broadly, the impacts of the Trump administration and the changing outlook for Central America, the Dialogue is pleased to welcome Carlos Dada and José Luís Sanz, the founder and the current director of El Faro, the preeminent online investigative journalism outlet in El Salvador and one of the most well-respected in Latin America. 

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China’s Emerging Role in the World and U.S.-China Relations

Time: 9:30am-1:00pm

Location: The Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Ave NE, Allison Auditorium

Information: Since the April summit between President Trump and China’s President Xi Jinping, subsequent international events have made it difficult to assess the true trajectory of U.S.-China relations. Join us as our panels of distinguished experts examine two of the main drivers of the relationship – economics and foreign policy – especially looking toward potential developments after the 19th National Party Congress in the fall. 

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The Digital, Disruptive Future: A Conversation with the Inventor of Segway

Time: 10:00am-11:00am

Location: The Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW

Information: Robots and advanced manufacturing will affect everything, from the workplace to global supply chains to healthcare to infrastructure. In hospitals and medical research labs, Artificial intelligence (AI) combined with genomics has given us the power to better understand the human genome, make faster diagnoses, and even edit our genes to eradicate inherited diseases. On highways and city roads, advances in AI mean that self-driving cars and trucks loom on the horizon. We have already witnessed advanced computer hardware and software defeating the world’s best at games such as chess, Go, and poker. Undoubtedly, many other professions and areas in the years ahead will feel the same competition. Meanwhile, the promises of the digital future are challenged by the need to achieve cybersecurity, as well as to address ethical questions around responsible research and innovation. Dean Kamen has been innovating for five decades and holds 440 patents that have led to a host of products including the Segway, a home use dialysis system, the first portable insulin pump, and an advanced prosthetic arm for DARPA. Looking to the need for future innovators, he created FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), a program to encourage young people to be science and technology leaders, especially in the field of robotics. 

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The Russian Military-Industrial Complex

Time: 10:00am-11:30am

Location: CSIS, 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW

Information: Join CSIS for a discussion with Mathieu Boulegue, a partner at the risk management and strategic research consulting firm AESMA, on the current state and future evolution of the Russian military-industrial complex. Matthew will address a variety of key issues in the Russian defense industry, including the growing “civilianization” of the defense industry, the role of the Military-Industrial Commission in the decision-making process for the industry, and the recent evolution of industrial strategies in the defense sector. 

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The Lamppost Theory: Why Economic Policy So Often Comes Up Short

Time: 10:30am-12:00pm

Location: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave NW, Falk Auditorium

Information: At a moment when the Trump administration has relegated economists to the back rows, it’s a good time to ask why economists don’t have more influence on politicians, and why politicians find economists so frustrating. Visiting scholar Alan Blinder argues that politicians use economics the way a drunk uses a lamppost—for support, not for illumination. Blinder contends that politicians and economists succeed or fail on entirely different Darwinian principles—they hail from “two civilizations.” OnJune 20, Blinder, Barney Frank, and Vin Weber will discuss the lamppost theory (the subject of Blinder’s forthcoming book), what politicians and economists can learn from each other, and what this all means for the prospects for tax reform in 2017. After a moderated discussion, the speakers will take questions from the audience.

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Doing Reform Differently: Can Problem-Driven Iterative Adaptation Be Scaled-Up?- Democracy, Rights, & Governance Workgroup Event

Time: 11:30am-1:30pm

Location: Society for International Development, 1111 19th St NW, #700

Information: In the last several years some development experts have advocated for “Doing Development Differently” (DDD), which is an approach to development projects that prioritizes iteration, ongoing evaluation, and design derived from local problems and needs, as opposed to blueprint projects that start with a predetermined design and try to stick to it. The panel explores how DDD principles can be applied to the implementation of large-scale, system-wide reform. Drawing on experience in the education sector, the panelists will discuss whether and how system-wide reforms are amenable to iteration, design-as-one-goes, and localized input. Options and implications for evaluating such reform efforts, given the lack of a counterfactual, will also be debated.

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The Origins and Evolution of ISIS In Libya

Time: 12:30pm

Location: Atlantic Council, 1030 15th St NW

Information: Despite the ejection of the Islamic State from the Libyan city of Sirte in 2016, the terror group remains a threat in Libya, along with other extremist groups in the country. Libya’s fragmented political arena and increasing escalation among rivals on the ground further contribute to growing instability in the country. Examining the origins of the Islamic State and other jihadist actors in Libya presents insights into the formation of these groups, how they interfere in post-conflict state building, the threats they pose, and the complexities that arise after they no longer hold territory but continue to perpetrate attacks. Libya holds an important position in the global jihadist network. Indeed, the British-Libyan perpetrator of the May 2017 attack in Manchester emerged out of that network, as did the June 3 London Bridge attacker. The Rafik Hariri Center will convene a discussion on its new report, The Origins and Evolution of ISIS in Libya. The unique, comprehensive, and groundbreaking report examines the jihadist dynamics in Libya and offers recommendations to address this threat. The discussion will feature the report’s co-authors Jason Pack, Rhiannon Smith, and Karim Mezran, and the RAND Corporation’s Christopher Chivvis.

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The USIA Experience: Lessons for the Proposed USAID/State Department Merger

Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

Location: CSIS, 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, 2nd floor conference center

Information: Please join us for an expert panel discussion that examines the proposed major organizational restructuring of the State Department and USAID through the lens of the previous merger of the State Department and the U.S. Information Agency (USIA). In response to President Trump’s request for reorganization proposals, the Department of State’s leadership is quietly reviewing various options to streamline the United States’ diplomatic and development operations. One of the proposals under consideration is a merger of the State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).While there are certainly changes that can be made at both organizations, a State Department/USAID merger—where personnel, procurement, programmatic, and budgeting functions are combined—would be a huge mistake. To understand the risks and downsides of such a move, we can look to the experience of the merger of the U.S. Information Agency (USIA) into the State Department in 1999.

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The Geo-Strategic Importance Of Southeast Europe: Opportunities for U.S. Policymakers and Business Leaders

Time: 2:00pm-3:15pm

Location: German Marshall Fund, 1744 R St NW

Information: In the last few months, Kosovo, Macedonia, and Croatia have all weathered political crises. Russia has been accused of meddling in the internal affairs of Serbia, Montenegro, and Macedonia with the aim of derailing their Euroatlantic integration process. The crisis of the Croatian conglomerate Agrokor puts at risk sixty thousand jobs across the region. How fragile is Southeast Europe? This discussion will address the U.S. strategy in the region and what other U.S.-based nongovernmental actors, such as businesses and civil societies, can do to further support stability of this critical region.

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China’s “Belt and Road” Plan, and Three Asian Neighbors

Time: 2:00pm-3:30pm

Location: USIP, 2301 Constitution Ave NW

Information: China held an international conference last month that has advanced its massive Belt and Road Initiative, which will build infrastructural, trade and other links to nearly 70 countries. In three of China’s neighbors—Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Burma—energy projects, ports, dams and other Chinese investments promise potential benefits. But they also have prompted protests connected to local political disputes or even ethnic insurgencies. Join USIP on June 20 for a discussion of the broad impact of Chinese investments in these three countries, whose stable evolution remains a U.S. interest. In each of these countries, foreign investment is vital to building economies and creating jobs. But Burma suspended work in 2011 on the massive Myitsone Dam project after years of protests by ethnic Kachin people, environmental activists and others. Local residents remain displaced by the project and Burma’s government faces as much as $800 million in debts to China if it formally cancels the project. In Sri Lanka, China’s construction of a port at Hambantota has raised protests over land conflicts and the costs of government debts to China. Pakistan sees a forthcoming $50 billion-plus in Chinese investment as a much-needed economic boost, although ethnic Baluch have raised concerns that it threatens to marginalize them in their own province. Join specialists on China, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Burma for an exploration of how Chinese investment in these nearby states can help, or complicate local conditions.

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Continued Human Rights Suppression in Crimea

Time: 3:30pm-5:00pm

Location: National Endowment for Democracy, 1025 F St NW, #800

Information: Despite the hopes raised by the Euromaidan movement and a decrease in the number of civilian causalities in Ukraine, the last two years have shown backsliding in many areas. The report of the United Nations Human Rights Monitoring Mission in Ukraine highlighted that “the situation in the east of Ukraine remains volatile and may develop into a ‘frozen conflict’, creating a protracted environment of insecurity and instability.” In Crimea, restrictions on public demonstrations, civil society organizations, and the media are routine. This situation is exacerbated by concerted efforts to prevent Ukrainians and international human rights monitors, journalists, and others from traveling to Crimea. Governments, international organizations, and human rights organizations must take steps to bear witness to the on-going tragedy in Crimea and do their best to put a stop to it. This public event aims at raising awareness about the continued human rights suppression in Crimea since the Russian annexation.

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Human Geography of the Caucasus: Identity, Culture, and the Russian Factor

Time: 4:00pm-5:30pm

Location: Institute of World Politics, 1521 16th St NW

Information: Erik Khzmalyan will review the geographic boundaries of the Caucasus and countries located in the region and will identify the region’s ethnicities and their cultural and linguistic differences. Specifically, he will focus on those ethnicities that are less well known. He will then discuss Russia’s conquest of the Caucasus and the security challenges emanating from the Northern Caucasus.

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Discussion of Public Opinion on the Future of Europe with Pew Research Center

Time: 4:00pm

Location: Atlantic Council, 1030 15th St NW, 12th floor

Information: The vote of the British people to leave the EU produced a political earthquake that will change the face of Europe. The forces of fragmentation continue to challenge Europe at a moment of historic weakness caused by economic stagnation, external and internal security threats, massive migrant and refugee flows, and sharp political divisions both within and among countries.  In turn, the United States is reluctant to play its historic role as a facilitator—if not a driver—of European unity and action.  Populism and demagoguery have spread across the Atlantic. Mistrust of institutions, pessimism about the future, fear of terrorism, and resentment of economic stagnation have opened doors to belligerent nationalistic rhetoric offering simplistic solutions that can subvert the core values of the Euro-Atlantic community. What future are the people of Europe driving towards? Pew’s latest study, takes the pulse of Europe’s public.  Conducted across ten European Union (EU) countries (France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom), this study and discussion will focus on Brexit’s impact one year later, how Europeans view their countries’ relationships with the EU, their views toward how Europe’s leaders are handling issues like the economy and refugees, and what the pulse of Europe means for the future of the transatlantic community.

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Results Not Receipts: Counting the Right Things In Aid and Corruption

Time: 4:00pm-5:30pm

Location: Center for Global Development, 2055 L St NW

Information: Please join us to celebrate the launch of Charles Kenny’s latest book, Results Not Receipts: Counting the Right Things in Aid and Corruption. This work illustrates a growing problem: an important and justified focus on corruption as a barrier to development has led to policy change in aid agencies that is damaging the potential for aid to deliver results. Donors have treated corruption as an issue they can measure and improve, and from which they can insulate their projects at acceptable costs by controlling processes and monitoring receipts. Results Not Receipts highlights the weak link between donors’ preferred measures of corruption and development outcomes related to our limited ability to measure the problem. It discusses the costs of the standard anti-corruption tools of fiduciary controls and centralized delivery, and it suggests a different approach to tackling the problem of corruption in development: focus on outcomes.

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Wednesday, June 21st

Tipping Points: Finding Energy-Climate Balance

Time: 9:00am

Location: Atlantic Council, 1030 15th St NW

Information: The conference convenes 150 rising leaders from around the world to discuss one of the most pressing issues facing the next generation: finding a balance between mitigating and adapting to climate change while also providing secure and reliable energy to fuel our future. The bipartisan agenda includes a cross-generational lineup of senior speakers alongside future leaders and represents a range of views on energy and climate from both sides of the Atlantic. Confirmed speakers include Founder of Sun Edison and Generate Capital Jigar Shah, Campaign Director for Greenpeace USA Leila Dean,  President and Co-Founder of OPower Alex Laskey, former Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, CEO and Founder of Merdiam Thierry Deau, Manager for Environment and Policy Planning for ExxonMobil Peter Trelenberg, former Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, former EPA Administrator Christie Todd Whitman,  Chairman and CEO of the Libra Group George Logothetis, and Executive Vice President and Chief Economist of Statoil Eirik Waerness, among many others.

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Indian Prime Minister Modi Visits the U.S. and Israel

Time: 9:30am-12:00pm

Location: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave NW, Falk Auditorium

Information: Three years into his term, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will visit two countries with which India has close partnerships. He will return to Washington on June 25-26, this time for his inaugural meeting with President Trump. Following that, he will travel to Israel on July 5-6 for the first-ever visit by an Indian premier. For Israel, the growing relationship with India is part of a wide-ranging effort to deepen its relationship with major Asian powers including India, China, and Japan. On June 21, The India Project and the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings will host an event, with one panel each focused on India’s relationship with the United States and Israel. Panelists will discuss the state of and imperatives for these partnerships, expectations from the Indian prime minister’s visits, as well as prospects for bilateral, trilateral, and international cooperation. After each session, panelists will take audience questions.

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Africa’s Regional Economic Outlook: Restarting the Growth Engine

Time: 10:00am-11:30am

Location: CSIS, 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW

Information: Economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa slowed significantly in 2016—with average growth rates the lowest in two decades—in large part due to low commodity prices, a sluggish global economy, climate shocks, and insecurity. The IMF’s Regional Economic Outlook for Sub-Saharan Africa examines the prospects for an economic rebound in 2017 with a particular focus on fiscal policy adjustments, debt management, and investments in human capital development and diversification. The report also takes an in-depth look at informal economies in Africa and policy priorities in managing both challenges and opportunities. Join us for a discussion with Abebe Aemro Selassie, Director of the IMF’s African Department, on how best to support and harness Sub-Saharan Africa’s tremendous potential for economic growth. 

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Improving Aid to Stabilize Conflicts: The Afghan Case

Time: 10:00am-11:30am

Location: USIP, 2301 Constitution Ave NW

Information: In the past decade, the United States and its allies have invested billions of dollars on assistance in Afghanistan, Iraq and other conflict zones. In Afghanistan, the U.S. Agency for International Development has implemented projects to help stabilize the country as part of a counterinsurgency strategy. Making sure that such efforts are effective is vital to national security and efficient spending. To evaluate such stabilization-related assistance, USAID commissioned a study by the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project at Princeton University. Join USIP on June 21 for a first look at the results, which can inform more effective stabilization work in future conflicts. Among the findings of the forthcoming study is evidence that smaller, targeted projects tend to work better—an idea that will challenge policymakers to address how the U.S. government can best manage hundreds of smaller projects that are sensitive to local conditions amid a country at war. The study also finds that stabilization aid should account for the ways in which insurgents in a conflict are likely to undermine such projects. It also underscores that better data collection and monitoring are essential to calibrate stabilization activities to be most effective. Join USIP and USAID specialists on Afghanistan and stabilization efforts for a public discussion of this study which, provides lessons to improve U.S. policies and practices in calming conflicts abroad that threaten U.S. security and international stability.

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Monetary Policy, Trade, and Politics: An Update on the Transatlantic Relationship

Time: 11:45am-1:30pm

Location: Hudson Institute, 1201 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Suite 400

Information: 2017 is the year of campaigns across the West. President Trump’s inauguration in the United States was followed by the election of President Macron in France, snap elections in Great Britain, and the start of the general election campaign in Germany. In the span of nine months, the four largest powers in the transatlantic alliance will have confronted or experienced major political change. This has unleashed an expansive debate on the state of the West, from trade to monetary policy to the military alliance. To address these topics and more, Hudson Institute will host a discussion with fellow Peter Rough and senior fellows Tom Duesterberg and Brendan Brown. Join us on June 21 for a conversation on the status of transatlantic relations and how shifting political sentiments and recent events are likely to impact the alliance going forward.

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Maintaining Productivity In A Time of Uncertainty

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Location: Government Executive, 600 New Hampshire Ave NW, #4

Information: Change is inevitable with every new Administration, and so is the uncertainty that comes with it. In order to achieve mission success, federal agencies must be prepared to respond with strategies that will help make them more efficient. The organizations and the individuals that remain viable in an atmosphere of uncertainty are the ones that take the necessary steps to ensure that they are prepared to effectively navigate in an environment where the issues and challenges they face are not always clear-cut. What are the keys to maintaining a productive workforce in this ever-changing federal climate? Join us on June 21 for this digital event, as we explore successful approaches for ensuring that your agency remains mission-focused and goal-oriented in order to deliver positive organizational results.

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Iraqi Kurdistan at the Crossroads: A Report on Civil Society

Time: 3:00pm-4:30pm

Location: National Endowment for Democracy, 1025 F St NW, #800

Information: With a referendum on independence in speculation for autumn 2017, Iraqi Kurdistan stands at a crucial political juncture that has global implications. The increasing autonomy of the region promises to have a significant impact both on longstanding international efforts to stabilize Iraqi democratic institutions and attitudes. U.S. security policy, which relies on Kurdish forces in Iraq and Syria as vital allies in the fight against ISIL, may also be affected. Amid these high stakes, it is yet unclear whether civil society in the region is sufficiently independent and democratically minded to facilitate crucial social dialogue about the political future of Iraqi Kurdistan. In his presentation, journalist and political commentator Nawaf Haskan will draw on his experiences with Kurdish civil society to trace its evolution from the 2003 American-led international coalition intervention of Iraq to the upcoming independence referendum. Reporting on the state of civil society in Iraqi Kurdistan, he will offer recommendations for how domestic and international actors can most effectively facilitate positive change. Comments from Sherizaan Minwalla will follow.

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Addressing Climate Change Through Innovation

Time: 3:30pm-5:30pm 

Location: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1779 Massachusetts Ave NW

Information: The transition to a low-carbon economy after the Paris Agreement has been embraced by an unprecedented number of countries and thousands of subnational groups. International consensus holds that the Paris Agreement is a vital instrument for growing economies and curtailing global warming despite the United States’ stated intention to withdraw from it. The EU, moreover, remains steadfast in its determination to fully implement the Paris Agreement. In the context of the annual EU Climate Diplomacy Day, the Delegation of the European Union to the United States of America and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace are pleased to host a discussion on current trends in innovation and economically sound decarbonization efforts across key sectors. World Bank Group CEO Kristalina Georgieva will keynote.

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Thursday, June 22nd

EU Efforts and Transatlantic Cooperation in Combatting Antimicrobial Resistance

Time: 8:30am-10:00am

Location: CSIS, 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW

Information: Please join us for a conversation with H.E. Vytenis Andriukaitis, EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, for a discussion on transatlantic Antimicrobial Resistance cooperation. Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) is the ability of microorganisms to resist antimicrobial treatments, especially antibiotics. The EU and the United States recognize AMR as a serious threat to public health worldwide and have created the Transatlantic Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance (TATFAR) to coordinate efforts in the fight against AMR. In this discussion, we will reflect on the achievements of TATFAR and the way ahead for EU-U.S. cooperation in this vital endeavor. 

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Criminal Justice Reform and Reducing Recidivism: Remarks from Senate Committee on the Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA)

Time: 8:30am- 10:00am

Location: AEI, 1789 Massachusetts Ave NW, Auditorium

Information: Today, there are approximately 2.2 million individuals behind bars in the United States. The most recent estimates indicate that once released, more than two-thirds will recidivate within three years. Policymakers in recent years have pushed for sweeping criminal justice reforms to reduce mandatory minimum sentencing, lower recidivism rates, and provide greater opportunities for those returning home from prison. Please join AEI for a keynote address by Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA), chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, followed by a panel of experts to discuss criminal justice reform proposals and ideas on providing pathways of opportunities for those reentering society.  

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I Was Told to Come Alone: My Journey Behind the Lines of Jihad

Time: 10:30am-12:00pm

Location: New America, 740 15th St NW, Suite 900

Information: In her soon-to-be released memoir, I Was Told to Come Alone, New America Fellow Souad Mekhennet takes us on her journey behind jihadi lines. Her travels take her from the German neighborhoods where the 9/11 plotters were radicalized, all the way to the Turkish-Syrian border as she attempts to shed light on what goes on in the minds of young jihadists, and how we can understand what leads them to commit violent acts. Able to go where no Western reporter can, her memoir details chilling interactions with Al Qaeda, the Taliban, and ISIS, and provides a rare view into the culture of radicalization. Join New America at our D.C. office for an in-depth conversation with the author about her time behind the lines of jihad.

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The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam

Time: 11:00am-12:00pm

Location: Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Ave NE, Lehrman Auditorium

Information: The Strange Death of Europe – a Number 1 Bestseller in the United Kingdom – is a highly personal account of a continent and culture caught in the act of suicide.  Declining birth rates, mass immigration, and cultivated self-distrust and self-hatred have come together to make Europeans unable to argue for themselves and incapable of resisting their own comprehensive alteration as a society and an eventual end. This is not just an analysis of demographic and political realities, it is also an eyewitness account of a continent in self-destruct mode.  It includes accounts based on travels across the entire continent, from the places where migrants land to the places they end up, from the people who pretend they want them to the places which cannot accept them. Murray looks at the bigger and deeper issues which lie behind a continent’s possible demise, from an atmosphere of mass terror attacks to the steady erosion of our freedoms.  He addresses the disappointing failure of multiculturalism, Angela Merkel’s U-turn on migration, the lack of repatriation, and the Western fixation on guilt.  Murray travels to Berlin, Paris, Scandinavia, Lampedusa, and Greece to uncover the malaise at the very heart of the European culture, and to hear the stories of those who have arrived in Europe from far away.  He concludes with two visions for a new Europe – one hopeful, one pessimistic – which paint a picture of Europe in crisis and offer a choice as to what, if anything, it can do next.

RSVP: here

 

Opportunities for Taiwan’s Security, the Indigenous Submarine, and US Policy

Time: 11:45am-1:30pm

Location: Hudson Institute, 1201 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Suite 400

Information: The security relationship between Taiwan and the United States has endured decades. The United States remains committed to Taiwan’s security and has demonstrated as much with the sale of military equipment and other tangible support, as provisioned under the Taiwan Relations Act. Today, the People’s Republic of China continues to flex its growing diplomatic, political, and military muscle in the region, accelerating the development of its naval forces, including surface, subsurface, and amphibious capabilities. These present a challenge not only to Taiwan’s security, but also to the standing of the U.S. Navy in the western Pacific. To adapt, Taiwan has initiated its own programs, including the development of domestically designed and built submarines. On June 22, Hudson Institute’s Center for American Seapower will host a distinguished panel of experts to examine the evolving U.S.-Taiwan security relationship. The discussion will look at the PRC’s naval and amphibious threats to the balance of power in the western Pacific, what the U.S. can do to further support the Taiwanese military with weapons sales and technical assistance, and how U.S. policy can promote Taiwanese defense in the future.

RSVP: here

A Conversation with Vice President Mike Pence

Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

Location: Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Amphitheater of Ronald Reagan Building

Information: Please join us on June 22 for a conversation with Vice President Mike Pence and Wilson Center President and CEO Jane Harman, to discuss the U.S. contribution to prosperity and security in Central America. The Vice President will present the results of this week’s conference with leaders from the region on pressing security, economic, and governance challenges in the “Northern Triangle” countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras and the role of the United States and Mexico.  

RSVP: Registration is closed but webcast is available here

Young Professionals in Development Network (YPN) Happy Hour

Time: 5:30pm-7:30pm

Location: 18th St Lounge, 18th St NW 

Information: Please join the SID-W Young Professionals in Development Network (YPN) for a networking happy hour. The aim of the Network is to serve as an information resource and foster a community of interest of international development young professionals. You will have an opportunity to network with your peers and make some new connections. 

RSVP: here

Friday, June 23rd

Lessons From the Field: Innovation in Rule of Law Programming

Time: 9:00am-4:30pm

Location: USIP, 2301 Constitution Ave NW

Information: The U.S. and other foreign assistance providers have long supported programs that strengthen the rule of law to advance peace, democracy, and development. Today, strategies and tactics are changing rapidly, with an increasing emphasis on coordinating aid, learning lessons from the field and using technology to heighten impact. On Friday, June 23, join the U.S. Institute of Peace and the University of South Carolina’s Rule of Law Collaborative for a daylong symposium highlighting new approaches and technologies to further the rule of law. Technologies like mobile banking and smartphone applications are emerging as valuable tools for advancing the rule of law. At the same time, the private sector is playing an increasing role in providing assistance—corporations, for example, are seeking to support changes on the ground as public demand increases for them to demonstrate social responsibility. In the symposium, experts with diverse experience across the globe will discuss a range of approaches and innovations, from a mobile app that connects legal defenders with civil society leaders to the more intangible challenge of building the political will to apply the rule of law. Others will outline programs in Yemen and Libya, as well as trends in how donors and those providing assistance coordinate and cooperate in providing their aid.

RSVP: here

Exit Interview with Ambassador Daniel Fried 

Time: 10:30am-11:30am

Location: CSIS, 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, 1st floor conference center

Information: Please join us for a roundtable conversation with Ambassador Daniel Fried to discuss his 40 years of public service to the United States. Ambassador Fried retired in February of this year after holding multiple positions within the State Department, including Ambassador to Poland from 1997 to 2000.

RSVP: here 

Nuclear Posture Review: Opportunities and Challenges

Time: 11:00am-12:30pm

Location: The Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Ave NE, Lehrman Auditorium

Information: In January, the Department of Defense launched a Nuclear Posture Review to be completed in 2017.  The resultant document will evaluate the current state of the U.S. nuclear enterprise and establish guidelines for future policy.  The questions related to U.S. nuclear posture take on a heightened importance in the context of the need to modernize nuclear weapons in tight budget environment and worsening national security trends, including a resurgent Russia and aggressive North Korea.  How has the global nuclear security environment changed?  What role should nuclear weapons play in support of the priority U.S. national security policy goals of deterring attacks, assuring allies and limiting damage should deterrence fail? The National Institute for Public Policy has taken on the challenge of examining these questions in its new study, A New Nuclear Review for a New Age.  The study includes contributions from a bipartisan team of over 30 experts in nuclear policy in order to assist those charged with producing the 2017 Nuclear Posture Review.  Join us as our panelists share their findings and discuss the road ahead for the U.S. nuclear enterprise.

RSVP: here

Settlements at 50 Years- An Obstacle to Peace and Democracy

Time: 12:30pm-1:45pm

Location: Middle East Institute, 1319 18th St NW

Information: This month marks 50 years of Israeli control over the West Bank. Recent surveys show that a majority of Israelis support peace negotiations with the Palestinians and the majority of Israeli Jews believe Israel should not annex large parts of the territories. Nevertheless, the Israeli government continues to expand settlements and is considering legislation to annex land in the West Bank. What motivates and enables the Israeli government to continue settlement expansion in the West Bank? What are the implications for the future of peace and Israel’s long-term democratic survival? Join us for a conversation with Talia Sasson, president of the New Israel Fund (NIF), former state attorney and special advisor to the late Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, and author of At the Edge of the Abyss: Is the Victory of the Settlements the End of Israeli Democracy? Haaretz‘s Washington correspondent Amir Tibon will moderate the discussion.

RSVP: here


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