International Affairs Events in DC

Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 7/16-7/22

 

Monday, July 16th

JCPOA 2.0: Iran, Europe, Trump, and the Future of the Iran Deal

Time: 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Location: The U.S. Capitol Visitor Center, First St NE, Washington, DC 20515, USA (Room SVC-210/212)

Information: Nearly two months have passed since President Trump exited from the Iran nuclear deal and announced the reimposition of nuclear-related sanctions on Iran. While major businesses have withdrawn from the Iranian market in the wake of the decision, the remaining parties to the accord have continued to engage in dialogue about how to keep the accord alive.Will President Trump’s Iran sanctions push bear fruit? Will the remaining parties sideline President Trump and keep the accord alive? Join us on Monday, July 16, 2018 from Noon to 1:00 PM in the Capitol Visitor Center Room SVC-210/212 for an expert discussion on the Trump administration’s approach toward Iran.

RSVP: here

 

With Partners Like These: Strategies and Tools for Counterterrorism Cooperation

Time: 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Location: Center for Strategic and International Studies, 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036 (map)

Information: Please join the CSIS International Security Program for a panel discussion on U.S. security assistance and counterterrorism cooperation. Using Dr. Tankel’s recent book “With Us and Against Us” as a point of departure, the discussion will focus on the evolution of the United States using security cooperation to work by, with, and through partners. The panel will examine areas of change and continuity from multiple perspectives: the changing nature of the threat; lessons learned from past partnership capacity building experiences; growing reliance on the U.S. military to broker and maintain these partnerships; and the United States’ evolving relationships with its counterterrorism partners.

RSVP: here

Tuesday, July 17th

The Changing Nature of Elections in Africa: Impact on Peacebuilding

Time: Tuesday, Jul 17 from 10:30 am to 12:00 pm

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20004

Information: The 2018 Southern Voices Network for Peacebuilding (SVNP) Conference will be held from 16-19 July at the Institute for Peace and Security Studies (IPSS) at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. This year, the theme of the conference is “National, Regional, and Global Infrastructures for Peace in Africa.” Participants in the conference will comprise mostly heads of organizations and senior officials from the SVNP, along with external stakeholders and practitioners from Africa and beyond. The conference will include both private and public sessions on topics related to the overall theme. Panel discussions will explore the nature, scale, and scope of the infrastructures in place for peacebuilding at the national, regional, and global levels; evaluate the extent to which they are functioning; and, provide best practices and ways forward for building off of or reforming current infrastructures. Join us on Tuesday, 17 July, for a session on “The Changing Nature of Elections in Africa: Impact on Peacebuilding.” Discussants will share perspectives on elections in Africa, including key challenges to consolidating democracy. They will also explore the link between elections and peacebuilding; assess how elections are considered as a part of the larger peacebuilding frameworks; and, consider the development of elections on the continent and share lessons learned and best practices on their changing nature. This session will focus on sharing concrete recommendations for improving and safeguarding the integrity of elections in Africa, and for ensuring stronger and more effective integration into peacebuilding efforts.

RSVP: here

 

The Trump-Putin Summit: Where Does the U.S.-Russia Relationship Go from Here?

Time: 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Location: Please note: Ground Truth Briefings are conducted exclusively by phone. There will be no physical meeting at the Wilson Center.

Information: On July 16, President Trump is set to meet with President Putin in Helsinki. Coming in the wake of a turbulent NATO meeting and amid high stakes, the summit has garnered intense focus. There are deep divisions on key issues between the U.S. and Russia, including election interference, the wars in Ukraine and Syria, and arms control. Are there agreements to be achieved, or will this summit be short on substance?In this Ground Truth Briefing, veteran observers and practitioners of U.S.-Russia policy will offer a post-summit assessment and analyze what these developments mean for the U.S.-Russia relationship moving forward.

RSVP: U.S. toll-free number: 888-942-8140 (Participant passcode: 13304)

 

Supporting Democracy in Challenging Times

Time: 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm

Location: Center for Strategic and International Studies, 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036 (map)

Information: For more than three decades, the United States has provided bipartisan support to secure freedom, human rights and democratic governance for countries around the world through the work of the National Endowment for Democracy, along with its four core institutes, the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE), the International Republican Institute (IRI), the National Democratic Institute (NDI), and the Solidarity Center.  The Endowment was a shared vision by President Ronald Reagan and bipartisan members of Congress to invest in advancing democratic values, freedom and opportunity as a moral and political mandate. Over the past decade, the work of promoting democracy has been increasingly challenging amidst a phenomenon of democratic recession and resurgent authoritarianism, which is increasingly viewed by scholars as a new era of ideological and political contestation. Systemic corruption, deep inequality and injustice, and the failure of governments to address the needs of ordinary citizens breed political instability, terrorism, and massive flows of refugees – conditions that threaten our own security and well-being.  Authoritarian leaders are capitalizing on these conditions and accelerating their efforts to penetrate and corrupt fragile states through aggressive political, economic, technological and cultural mechanisms with the goal of reaping political influence and acquiring strategic resources.

Today’s investment in supporting democracy includes support for freedom and human rights, but also for transparency, the rule of law, private enterprise, and countering disinformation and ideological extremism.

Please join us at CSIS on July 17 as we host the heads of the NED, CIPE, IRI, NDI, and the Solidarity Center to discuss the new challenges in supporting democracy.

RSVP: here

 

Addressing Sexual Violence Through Peace Processes: A View From Colombia

Time: 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Location: U.S. Institute of Peace 2301 Constitution Ave, NW, Washington, DC

Information: Sexual violence is a crime against humanity and is commonly used as a systematic weapon of war against women and men. Research that illustrates the forms, frequency and context of sexual violence is critical to help build peace and prevent the recurrence of such violence. Join the U.S. Institute of Peace, Oxfam and the Latin America Working Group for a discussion on addressing sexual violence in peace processes using evidence from recent survey results from Colombia.

A recent survey on the prevalence of sexual violence against women in the armed conflict in Colombia, supported by Oxfam, provides quantitative information for the period 2010-2015. An analysis of its findings is crucial to understand how to address the problem in the context of transitional justice as part of a peace process. The event will discuss the survey, inclusion of provisions addressing sexual violence in the Colombian government-FARC peace agreement, and the challenges of implementation as a new government is about to take office in Colombia. The panel will include Colombian women who conducted the survey and are from organizations that are part of the “Rape and Other Violence: Take My Body Out From War” campaign. They will speak from their own experiences, discuss the survey, and share reflections on their advocacy to address sexual violence in the peace agreement and its implementation.

RSVP: here

 

Wednesday, July 18th

Will Pakistan’s Youth be a Boom or Bust for its Democracy?

Time: 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Location: U.S. Institute of Peace 2301 Constitution Ave, NW, Washington, DC

Information: With over 44 percent of new voters between the ages of 18 and 35, Pakistan’s youth will play an important role in the upcoming elections and influence the future of the country’s democracy. To harness the power of Pakistan’s youth, a recent UNDP Human Development Report argues for a national focus on youth empowerment through education, employment, and meaningful engagement. Failing to do so could lead to youth anger and dissent, spelling disaster for the future of Pakistan. The Pakistani state is already facing grievance-fueled movements. Ring-wing extremist groups have gained political strength, notably staging a 21-day sit-in in Pakistan’s capital in November of last year, while more secular mobilization pressing human rights claims also gained momentum. According to the report, youth will prove to be a dividend or a serious challenge to the country, depending on how Pakistan invests in their development. To positively impact that policy, youth must be empowered and engaged. To examine the state of Pakistan’s youth and their potential impact on upcoming elections and democracy, please join the U.S. Institute of Peace for a panel discussion on July 18th.

RSVP: here

 

Thursday, July 19th

The Long-Term Impact of Violence against Women and New Approaches to Addressing It

Time: 9:00 am to 11:00 am

Location: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC (Room: 6th Floor)

Information: Violence Against Women (VAW) has a profound impact, immediately and over time, on all community members. The Wilson Center’s Latin American Program and the Inter-American Development Bank have joined together in a series of studies that shed new light on this serious issue, including the unique vulnerabilities of indigenous women facing intrafamily violence, the profile of women who are in jail, how violence is transmitted across generations, and good practices to prevent VAW and better support survivors. These insights suggest new and important ways to address the violence and reduce its impact on individuals and society in general. Join us on Thursday, July 19, 2018 at the Woodrow Wilson Center for a discussion with experts about the impacts of VAW and innovative ways in which states and policymakers have responded.

RSVP: here

 

Assessing US Policy Toward South Sudan

Time: 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Location: U.S. Institute of Peace 2301 Constitution Ave, NW, Washington, DC

Information: South Sudan’s civil war is one of the most brutal and destructive conflicts of the 21st century. Could the war have been prevented? Could some of the atrocities and misery caused by the war have been avoided? Join the U.S. Institute of Peace and the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Simon-Skjodt Center for the Prevention of Genocide on July 19 to discuss what lessons should be learned from U.S. policy toward South Sudan in the years leading up to and during the civil war. A new report by Simon-Skjodt Center Visiting Fellow Jon Temin that addresses several pivotal periods and alternative policy options in U.S.-South Sudan policy will be the springboard for the discussion. South Sudan experts and former U.S. officials will comment on Temin’s findings and discuss how lessons from U.S. policy on South Sudan should be applied to ongoing efforts to prevent and mitigate atrocities in South Sudan and around the world.

RSVP: here

 

Russia’s Interference in the US Judiciary

Time: 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm

Location: Atlantic Council, 1030 15th St NW, Washington, DC (map) Room: 12th Floor, West Tower Elevators

Information: Please join the Atlantic Council for the launch of our report, Russia’s Interference in the US Judiciary on Thursday, July 19, 2018 from 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Atlantic Council headquarters. Under President Vladimir Putin, lawlessness has taken over the Russian state, including its law enforcement branch. Putin’s system and its proxies are exploiting both the domestic and international legal system to their own benefits. This system stands in sharp contrast to Western rule of law, but it utilizes the Western financial and legal system to its own benefit. The US justice system needs to address this exploitation of the US judiciary for nefarious purposes and act decisively to safeguard US democratic institutions. The report, which is authored by Dr. Anders Åslund, senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Eurasia Center, outlines the ways the Kremlin is exploiting the US judicial system to undermine the rule of law both in Russia and in the United States. The Atlantic Council is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss this topic. Speakers include Dr. Anders Åslund, Mr. Bill Browder, Mr. Pavel Ivlev, and Mr. Casey Michel. The discussion will be moderated by Ms. Brittany Beaulieu.

RSVP: here

 

Dialogue with the Next Generation of African Peacebuilders

Time: 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20004 (map)

Information: The 2018 Southern Voices Network for Peacebuilding (SVNP) Conference will be held from 16-19 July at the Institute for Peace and Security Studies (IPSS) at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. This year, the theme of the conference is “National, Regional, and Global Infrastructures for Peace in Africa.” Participants in the conference will comprise mostly heads of organizations and senior officials from the SVNP, along with external stakeholders and practitioners from Africa and beyond. The conference will include both private and public sessions on topics related to the overall theme. Panel discussions will explore the nature, scale, and scope of the infrastructures in place for peacebuilding at the national, regional, and global levels; evaluate the extent to which they are functioning; and, provide best practices and ways forward for building off of or reforming current infrastructures. On Thursday, 19 July, the Wilson Center Africa Program and IPSS will partner on an event, “Dialogue with the Next Generation of African Peacebuilders,” which will feature IPSS fellows from their MAPSA and SVNP fellowship alumni based in Addis Ababa. This partnership event will seek to share the perspectives of scholars and practitioners working on peacebuilding issues in Africa. Fellows on the panel will share lessons learned and best practices from their work, as well as recommendations for key areas for study for future fellows.

RSVP: here

 

Friday, July 20th

Open House for Prospective Students at The Institute of World Politics

Time: 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Location: Institute of World Politics, 1521 16th Street NW Washington, DC (map)

Information: Join us for a cocktail reception to learn about our unique graduate programs in the areas of National Security, Intelligence, and International Affairs. A panel discussion and information Q&A about The Institute of World Politics (IWP) will follow. All those interested in IWP’s application and admission process are welcome to attend.

Who we are: The Institute of World Politics is a graduate school dedicated to developing leaders with a sound understanding of international realities and the ethical conduct of statecraft. IWP students learn the arts of statecraft from true practitioner professors, and our alumni work in diplomacy, the Intelligence Community, the private sector, political leadership, and nonprofit organizations.

RSVP: here

 

 

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