Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 02/11 – 02/15

Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 02/11 – 02/15

Monday, February 11th

India’s Inter-State Water Wars: Causes, Consequences, and Cures

Time: 10:00am – 11:30am

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: The Wadhwani Chair in U.S.-India Policy Studies at CSIS is pleased to invite you to a discussion on ‘India’s Inter-State Water Wars: Causes, Consequences, and Cures,’ a topic covered in a new book of Subnational Hydropolitics: Conflict, Cooperation, and Institution-Building in Shared River Basins by Dr. Scott Moore, who serves as Senior Fellow at the Penn Water Center, Director of China Programs in the Office of the Provost, and Senior Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania Kleinman Center for Energy Policy and The Water Center at Penn.

From the San Francisco Bay area to Sao Paulo to Riyadh, water shortages increasingly cloud economic forecasts. But nowhere is the risk greater than in South Asia, where India, the largest economy and most important regional power, faces crippling shortages and a lack of consensus on what to do about them. In turn, water problems threaten to drag down India’s economic growth and slow its rise to regional power. In this talk, Scott Moore will draw on his recent book, Subnational Hydropolitics: Conflict, Cooperation, and Institution-Building in Shared River Basins, to explore some of the causes of India’s many inter-state water disputes, and what they say about the state of India’s federal system. He’ll also discuss some promising ways to convert India’s pervasive sub-national water wars into cooperation.

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Japan’s role in Asia’s connectivity: Infrastructure finance and digital governance

Time: 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Location: Brookings Institution, Falk Auditorium, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20036

Information: The connectivity agenda is essential to Asia’s economic growth: from the supply of high-quality infrastructure to enable efficient production and transportation networks, to the dissemination of digital standards critical to information flows, services, and the burgeoning digital economy. While discussions on Asia’s connectivity agenda have focused on China’s growing influence through its Belt and Road Initiative and its plans for a Digital Silk Road, Japan has long played an important role in financing infrastructure projects in the region and has stepped up its economic diplomacy. In addition to its $200 billion Quality Infrastructure Initiative, Japan has established a cooperation mechanism with the United States and Australia to support private sector investment in regional infrastructure, while also agreeing to some collaboration with China on infrastructure projects in third countries. On the digital front, Japan has made data governance a centerpiece of its G20 chairmanship in 2019, and the recently enacted Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement includes rules that underpin the development of digital connectivity. 

On February 11, the Center for East Asia Policy Studies will host Kohei Toyoda, director for international coordination for the Trade Policy Bureau of the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, for a keynote address on Japan’s goals and policies to advance Asian connectivity. Following Mr. Toyoda’s remarks, a panel of experts will examine how to balance competition and collaboration among great powers in supplying Asia’s connectivity infrastructure, how much traction Japan’s Quality Infrastructure Initiative has gained in the region, and limitations and opportunities for Japan-China business cooperation in third countries. They will also address the prospect of a U.S.-Japan partnership on infrastructure and digital connectivity, as well as the challenges ahead for Japan to become a leader of digital connectivity. After the discussion, panelists will take questions from the audience.

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Is Bigger Better? Concentration, Competition, and Defense Contracting Outcomes

Time: 3:00pm – 4:30pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: In recent years, economists and policymakers have expressed heightened concern over industrial concentration and the potential for monopolies in a number of sectors of the U.S economy, ranging from retail trade and manufacturing to finance and utilities. These concerns extend to the U.S. defense industry, which the nation depends upon to equip its military with a wide array of mission-essential goods and services. Growing concentration may hinder competition, reduce the availability of key supplies and equipment, and diminish vendors’ incentives for innovation and performance in government contracts. On the other hand, countries with comparatively smaller or less developed industrial bases often seek to promote consolidation, hoping national champion firms will gain the economies of scale to compete internationally. Even the United States encouraged consolidation during the post-Cold War drawdown in the 1990s, a policy that was announced to the defense industry at what is evocatively referred to as “The Last Supper.” CSIS undertook a study examining the relationship between industrial concentration and competition with U.S. defense acquisition performance outcomes. An expert panel will discuss the results of this study and the larger issues.

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Tuesday, February 12th

Seventh Annual U.S.-Mexico Security Conference: New Government, Old Challenges in Mexico’s Security Landscape

Time: 8:30am – 1:00pm

Location: 6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute invites you to its seventh annual Mexican security review. The forum will examine the pressing security challenges Mexico faces and how it plans to respond, including the rising importance of the fentanyl trade for organized crime. Two new research papers on fentanyl will be presented. The conference will also feature leading policy analysts discussing major security trends in 2019, efforts to professionalize the police, the proposed National Guard, efforts to prevent crime and reduce violence, as well as the future of U.S.-Mexico security cooperation under a new Mexican president. We hope you will be able to join us for this informative event.

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Democracy in the Muslim World Post Arab Spring

Time: 11:00am – 12:30pm

Location: Copley Formal Lounge, 3700 O St NW, Washington, DC 20007, USA

Information: Anwar Ibrahim is the leader of Malaysia’s ruling Pakatan Harapan coalition, President of the People’s Justice Party, and is expected to lead the country as its eighth Prime Minister. He served as Deputy Prime Minister from 1993-1998 and Finance Minister from 1991-1998. Since 1998, he has led the reform movement to strengthen democracy and the rule of law in the country. He has spent over ten of the past 20 years in solitary confinement as a prisoner of conscience. He received a full pardon for all of the crimes alleged against him and was released from incarceration days after his party won the 14th Malaysian General Election on May 9, 2018.

Anwar has held key positions in international institutions including President of UNESCO World Council, Chairman of the Development Committee of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, Honorary President of AccountAbility and member of the Advisory Board of the International Crisis Group. He was a Distinguished Visiting Professor and Malaysia Chair at the ACMCU. He has also taught at the Johns Hopkins SAIS and St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford, lecturing on issues of governance, democracy and contemporary politics in Southeast Asia

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Autonomy, Technology, and National Security: The Case for Reforming the Missile Technology Control Regime

Time: 11:45am – 1:30pm

Location: Hudson Institute, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Hudson Institute will host a discussion on the future of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR). Panelists will include University of Pennsylvania Professor Dr. Michael Horowitz, U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Benjamin Schwartz, and the Heritage Foundation’s Rachel Zissimos. The discussion will be moderated by Hudson Senior Fellow Dr. Arthur Herman.

With the global market for Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) predicted to reach $13 billion by 2024, militaries around the world are rapidly incorporating this critical technology into their operations. However, under the MTCR–a 1987 international agreement designed to prevent the proliferation of ballistic missiles–UAS are categorized as missiles, and the U.S. is severely restricted in exporting this technology to its closest allies. Other countries, including China and Russia, have taken this opportunity to become the prime sellers of UAS globally. Reform of the MTCR’s weapons classifications is necessary to strengthen U.S. national security and advance American technological progress.

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Report Launch on the ILO’s Global Commission on the Future of Work: Work For a Brighter Future

Time: 1:30pm – 3:00pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: In a recently released report from the International Labour Organization (ILO) about 344 million additional jobs globally are needed by 2030 to sustain a rapidly changing workforce. Another 190 million jobs need to be created to address unemployment, as nearly 34 percent of those unemployed are youth. As part of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, creating decent and sustainable work opportunities is a precedent and integrating the nearly 2 billion people that are in informal employment globally will be an essential part of that challenge. Added challenges such as social, economic, and political shifts that are influencing greater instability and uncertainty will require a globally coordinated, collective response. As part of the Global Commission on the Future of Work, the ILO has released its report “Work for a brighter future” which aims to address some of the key concerns related to the future of work. This report discusses the challenges that are driving global changes in the labor market, investments in lifelong learning, social protection systems, and how institutions can forge pathways to formality and reduce poverty.

This event will bring together major players who have produced “future of work” reports to have an in-depth discussion on the different views on the issues and recommendations put forth by the ILO.

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Civilizing Torture: An American Tradition

Time: 4:00pm – 5:30pm

Location: 6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Civilizing Torture places the controversy around “enhanced interrogation tactics” that dominated the national conversation during the War on Terror in a larger context throughout American history. The work underscores that Americans have acquiesced to the use of torture during “emergencies” far more often than the national conscience acknowledges. Reconciling state violence with the aspirations of Americans for social and political justice is an enduring challenge. By tracing the historical debates about the efficacy of torture and the attempt to adapt it to democratic values, Civilizing Torture reveals the recurring struggle to decide what limits Americans are willing to impose on the power of the state. 

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The European Strategic Landscape after the INF Treaty

Time: 6:00pm – 7:30pm

Location: Room 806, 1619 Massachusetts Avenue NW

Information: The Johns Hopkins SAIS European and Eurasian Studies (EES) Program cordially invites you to a discussion with Ms. Rebeca Hersman of CSIS on “The European Strategic Landscape after the INF Treaty.” The session will be moderated by Professor Alice Pannier.

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Wednesday, February 13th

Delivering Democracy in India

Time: 9:00am – 3:30pm

Location: Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C. Headquarters – 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Hudson Institute and the Embassy of India will host a day-long conference of scholars, diplomats, members of Indian parliament, and think tank leaders to discuss India’s democratic, economic, and societal achievements. They will also analyze the challenges that lie ahead, and opportunities for the world’s largest democracy.

Over the last few decades, India has successfully remained a democracy with strong political institutions, civilian supremacy over its military, and an overall vibrant economy and society. India has achieved this within a multi-religious, multi-ethnic society all while combatting the influences of regional adversaries. The conference will convene expert panels to discuss governance, society, the economy, and how these forces interact in India.

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Report Launch: Risk and Resilience: Advancing Food and Nutrition Security in Nigeria

Time: 9:00am – 11:0am

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Please join the CSIS Global Food Security Project for the launch of our newest report, Risk and Resilience: Advancing Food and Nutrition Security in Nigeria through Feed the Future, by Julie Howard and Emmy Simmons. The report examines what the new Feed the Future strategy’s emphasis on resilience means in Nigeria, one of the newly-designated target countries. Nigeria, with the continent’s largest economy, is arguably the most important partner for the United States in Africa and is on the verge of a critical presidential election. Through the lens of Nigeria, especially the northeast, the report examines the risks and opportunities related to extending the highly-regarded U.S. global hunger and food security initiative to more fragile countries. 

The event will feature a dialogue on why the United States’ leadership on global food security, particularly in fragile, climate, and conflict-affected regions, is critical to U.S. national security and reducing global poverty and malnutrition. How can the U.S. adapt its successful experience with facilitating inclusive, private sector-driven agricultural development to more fragile environments? Can boosting resilient systems, jobs, incomes, and nutrition in the agricultural sector – where most people live and work – help address the root causes of fragility and conflict in Nigeria and other regions?

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Digital Surveillance Unleashed: Implications for Human Rights, Democracy, and American Influence

Time: 9:00am – 10:30am

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Digital repression is occurring with increasing frequency across the world. One of the most important actors is China. It is using increasingly sophisticated technology in its pervasive surveillance systems, which it employs along with human surveillance to control ethnic and religious minorities, among others. The effects of this surveillance on the Uyghurs in Xinjiang is the most publicized instance. China’s nascent “social credit system” also incorporates artificial intelligence to rank the country’s population by 2020 and offer or deny access to travel, education, and jobs. Reporting indicates that Chinese companies are selling this technology to governments from Malaysia to Ecuador. China also increasingly seeks to influence internet governance and the information ecosystem. Mass and weakly regulated surveillance of civilian populations and Chinese-style internet governance will challenge democracy and human freedom, and support a governance model that diverges dramatically from that of the US and its closest allies. This event will focus on these challenges and potential policy approaches to address them.

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A conversation on defense policy with Rep. Seth Moulton

Time: 9:30am – 11:00am

Location: Brookings Institution, Falk Auditorium, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20036

Information: The United States today faces a diverse array of threats to its security. These threats include familiar challenges, like the scourge of radical extremism, while newer ones like the rise of China and Russia’s revanchist foreign policy require updated thinking and new capabilities. After two years of Republican rule in Washington, the newly inaugurated Democratic House of Representatives promises to assert itself in U.S. foreign and defense policymaking. By wielding budgetary power and pursuing oversight of the Trump administration, Democrats’ power in the House has implications for an array of issues concerning America’s relationships in the world. On February 12, Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.) will deliver a keynote at the Brookings Institution on House Democrats’ vision for the future of U.S. defense policy. Then, Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon will engage Rep. Moulton in a conversation on what a new era of divided government means for defense policy, budgets, and strategic planning. Questions from the audience will follow their conversation.

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From War to Peace in the Balkans, the Middle East and Ukraine

Time: 12:00pm – 2:00pm

Location: Room 500, 1717 Massachusetts Avenue NW

Information: The Conflict Management Program and the Faculty Research Forum invite you to join a discussion with Dr. Daniel Serwer, Director of Conflict Management and American Foreign Policy and Scholar at the Middle East Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. 

Dr. Serwer’s new book focuses on the origins, consequences and aftermath of the 1995 and 1999 Western military interventions that led to the end of the most recent Balkan wars. Though challenging problems remain in Bosnia, Macedonia, Kosovo, and Serbia, the conflict prevention and state-building efforts thereafter were partly successful as countries of the region are on separate tracks towards European Union membership. This study highlights lessons that can be applied to the Middle East and Ukraine, where similar conflicts are likewise challenging sovereignty and territorial integrity. It is an accessible treatment of what makes war and how to make peace ideal for all readers interested in how violent international conflicts can be managed, informed by the experience of a practitioner.

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Walk in U.S., Talk on Japan

Time: 3:00pm – 5:00pm

Location: American University, SIS Building, Abramson Family Founders Room, 4400 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016Information: Join us for a panel discussion on the relationship between the US and Japan from the perspective of diplomatic relations, security interests, business, and education. The panel will include Ambassador Ken Shimanouchi, former Japanese ambassador to Spain and Brazil; Fumio Ota, Vice Admiral (ret.) of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force; Megumi Inoue, an international businesswoman; and Yui Ozaki, a current undergraduate student. The panel discussion will be followed by a reception.

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Morality and the Middle East

Time: 4:00pm – 5:00pm

Location: McGhee Library, Intercultural Center (ICC) – 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20007

Information: The Center for Jewish Civilization invites you to a lecture by Danielle Pletka. 

Half a million are dead in Syria. Turkey is becoming a dictatorship. Egypt is returning to dictatorship. Iran continues to destabilize the region. Saudi Arabia is becoming more erratic. Islamist extremism continues to cast a shadow. How should the United States consider its foreign policy towards the Middle East? Could morality could be a guide? 

Danielle Pletka is senior vice president for foreign and defense policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where she oversees the Institute’s work on foreign and defense issues. Ms. Pletka writes regularly on national security matters with a special focus on U.S. foreign policy and the Middle East. She has an M.A. from the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University and a B.A. from Smith College. 

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Thursday, February 14th

The End of American World Order?

Time: 11:00am – 12:30pm

Location: 1779 Massachusetts Ave NW Washington, DC 20036

Information: Whether or not America itself declines or thrives under President Trump’s leadership, the post-war liberal international order underpinned by U.S. military, economic, and ideological primacy and supported by global institutions serving the United States’ power and purpose is no longer stable. In a new edition of his widely acclaimed book, The End of American World Order, Amitav Acharya argues that while the United States will remain a major force in world affairs, it has lost the ability to shape world order after its own interests and image. Acharya will discuss his take on an emerging world order with Thomas Wright and Carnegie’s Salman Ahmed. Carnegie’s Ashley J. Tellis will moderate. Copies of the book will be available for sale.

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Careers in Global Development: Clarence Edwards

Time: 3:30pm – 5:00pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: The “Careers in Global Development” series features U.S. senior-level, multilateral and NGO officials who have worked in the field of development for at least twenty years. The series is aimed at young professionals who are interested in working in development and will include a one-hour dialogue on both the specific expertise of the speaker, as well as the speaker’s career path and influences along the way. It will focus on specific areas of interest, including the role of humanitarian assistance in development and U.S. foreign policy; development as a tool to counter violent extremism; and sectoral issues such as food security, health, and education.

This session features Clarence D. Edwards, Senior Adviser for the Embassy of Australia’s International Development Policy. Edwards’ areas of specialization include policy advocacy, strategic communications, and political analysis. He has successfully advocated for increased attention towards neglected tropical diseases on behalf of the Albert Sabin Vaccine Institute, and for more funding for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria programs on behalf of Bono and the ONE Campaign, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Institute for One World Health. Edwards’ background also includes managing the congressional program at the Council on Foreign Relations, handling relations with the foreign media as a Clinton Administration political appointee at the State Department, and managing political research for a corporate lobbyist. He has been named an Aspen Environmental Forum Scholar and a future leader by Atlantik-Brücke and the German Marshall Fund. Edwards has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland and is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies.

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Roundtable with Liberty Korea Party Leaders

Time: 3:30pm – 5:00pm

Location: Intercultural Center (ICC) 302-P – 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20007

Information: Please join the Asian Studies Program for a roundtable discussion with Liberty Korea Party distinguished members on U.S. foreign policy toward Northeast Asia and the Korean peninsula. The event will be moderated by Dr. Michael Green, Director of Asian Studies and Professor of International Affairs in the School of Foreign Service. Kang Seok-Ho (3-term, 2008~) is the Chairman of the Foreign Affairs and Unification Committee. Previously, he chaired the Intelligence Committee as well as served as a Member of the Party Supreme Council. Kim Jae-Kyung (4-term, 2004~) is the Ranking Member of the Foreign Affairs and Unification Committee and Chairman of the Party Central Committee. He previously chaired the Special Committee on Budget and Accounts. Baek Seung-Joo (1-term, 2016~) is the Ranking Member of the National Defense Committee and Chairman of the Policy Coordination Committee of the Party on National Security, Foreign and Unification Affairs. Previously, he served as Vice Minister of the Ministry of National Defense. Khang Hyo-Shang (1-term, 2016~) is the Deputy Floor Leader of the Liberty Korea Party at the National Assembly where he serves on the Environment and Labor Committee. Previously, he was Managing Editor and Correspondent in D.C. of the Chosunilbo.

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Friday, February 15th

Diverse Diplomacy Speaker Series — A Talk with FSO Miriam Murray 

Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
Location: McGhee Library, Intercultural Center (ICC) – 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20007
Information: Join us to listen to Miriam Murray, 15-year career Foreign Service Officer, share her insights on diversity and inclusion at the State Department and advice for diverse candidates considering a career in foreign policy. Note: due to space limitations, seating is on a first come, first served basis.
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The Iran Deal and North Korea

Time: 6:30pm – 8:00pm
Location: Elliott School of International Affairs, 1957 E Street, NW, Room 505 
Information: Speakers: Matthew Henry Kroenig, Associate Professor in the Department of Government and the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University Event Topics:
1) Problems with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA)
2) Domestic and foreign backlash on the JCPOA
3) Similarities & differences of the two rogue nations (Iran & North Korea)
4) Possibility of setting a bad precedent with North Korea