Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 02/18 – 02/22

Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 02/18 – 02/22

 

Tuesday, February 19th

 

Protecting a Free and Open Indo-Pacific: Strengthening the U.S.-Japan-India Trilateral Relationship

Time: 11:45am – 2:00pm

Location: Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C. Headquarters – 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Hudson Institute will host a public conference on the importance of trilateral cooperation between the U.S., India, and Japan for the future prosperity and security of the Indo-Pacific Region. Panelists will include Nobukatsu Kanehara, deputy secretary general of the National Security Secretariat & assistant chief cabinet secretary for the government of Japan; Tom Rose, senior advisor & chief strategist for the Office of the Vice President of the United States; Vice Admiral (ret.) Shekhar Sinha, former commander-in-chief of India’s Western Naval Command; and Hudson Institute’s Lewis Libby, Michael Pillsbury, Patrick Cronin, and Arthur Herman.

From naval exercises in the South China Sea to the Belt and Road Initiative, China’s increasingly aggressive military and economic strategies threaten the liberal order of the Indo-Pacific. In response, leaders of the U.S., Japan, and India are finding common ground over the need for a “free and open Indo-Pacific” to preserve regional independence, security, and prosperity. On February 19, experts will address the regional challenges and areas of possible cooperation between allies in countering China’s expansionist policies.

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Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War

Time: 6:30pm – 8:00pm

Location: American University, SIS Building, Abramson Family Founders Room, 4400 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016

Information: Militaries around the world are racing to build robotic systems with increasing autonomy. What will happen when a Predator drone has as much autonomy as a Google car? Should machines be given the power to make life and death decisions in war? Paul Scharre, a former Army Ranger and Pentagon official, will talk about his new book, Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War.

Army of None was named one of Bill Gates’ Top 5 Books of 2018. Scharre will explore the technology behind autonomous weapons and the legal, moral, ethical, and strategic dimensions of this evolving technology. Paul Scharre is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Technology and National Security Program at the Center for a New American Security.

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Wednesday, February 20th

The Ambassador Series: The Romanian Presidency and the European Union

Time: 9:45am – 11:00am

Location: Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C. Headquarters – 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Hudson Institute will host Romanian ambassador George Maior for a discussion on the Romanian presidency of the European Union. The conversation will be moderated by Walter Russell Mead, the Ravenel B. Curry III Distinguished Fellow in Strategy and Statesmanship at Hudson. Romania has begun its six-month presidency of the Council of the European Union at a critical juncture marked by the looming Brexit deadline, the upcoming European Parliament elections and continued security challenges on its Eastern border. Hudson is pleased to host Ambassador Maior as he discusses the agenda that Romania has set for the EU; its key role in defending the Black Sea and NATO’s eastern flank and in promoting energy security; and the future of the EU post-Brexit.

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Kaizen: A management philosophy for advancing development in Africa

Time: 1:30pm – 4:30pm

Location: Brookings Institution – Falk Auditorium, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20036

Information: The lack of managerial capital in developing countries is known to impede productivity growth and economic transformation. Some donors, such as the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), identified the need to tackle this issue. With that in mind, JICA has been dedicating resources to dissemination and implementation of kaizen, the Japanese style management approach, in several countries and regions including Brazil, Mexico, Ethiopia, Tunisia, and Eastern Europe, beginning in the 1990s. However, when it comes to applying the approach in African countries, more analysis of the effectiveness and challenges of different management methods in developing countries is needed. JICA Research Institute (JICA-RI) and Global Development Network (GDN) have jointly begun analyzing different cases in the developing countries where kaizen has been introduced in both small and big companies and how it has been disseminated and adopted (or not) in order to provide a new perspective on quality and productivity. On February 20, the Africa Growth Initiative at Brookings, JICA-RI, and GDN will co-host discussions examining the impact of kaizen in African countries and other developing countries like Brazil, the Philippines, and Vietnam. They will also investigate the link between industrial policy and firm capabilities, especially in the context of inclusive and sustainable growth. After each discussion, panelists will take questions from the audience.

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The State of the State Department Preview Screening

Time: 5:30pm – 7:00pm

Location: ICC Auditorium – 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20007

Information: Preview screening and panel discussion of Great Decisions documentary. Open to the public.

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Thursday, February 21st

Oil Market Update: Searching for Stability

Time: 8:45am – 2:00pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Following the precipitous drop in oil prices at the end of 2018, we enter the new year with a renewed commitment from the OPEC/non-OPEC alliance to rebalance oil markets, continued upheaval in places like Venezuela and Libya, and assurances of U.S. intent to eliminate Iranian oil exports. In the background, a number of troublesome challenges―financial, technical, infrastructure, political and geopolitical―remain unresolved. Looming questions on the weakening of the global economy, the impacts of trade disputes, prospects for continued U.S. production growth given volatile prices, productivity challenges, cash flow constraints, evolving bottlenecks and export capacity, crude quality and regulatory challenges (RFS and IMO), and renewed call for a green energy transformation continue to plague investors and strategic planners alike. Against this backdrop, the CSIS Energy and National Security Program is pleased to host a most distinguished group of experts to discuss the outlook for global oil markets. Please join us!

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Canada’s Foreign Policy Under Scrutiny

Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Location: 5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: As the government of Justin Trudeau prepares to seek re-election this year, Canada’s foreign policy is coming under new scrutiny. Has Canada assumed a new mantle of moral leadership in the world? Are the Liberals charting a new course on human rights with Russia, Saudi Arabia, and China, and driving change for women? Is its return to peacekeeping real or illusory? Join Andrew Cohen, author, professor, journalist and Global Fellow of the Canada Institute on Thursday, February 21 from 12:00 – 1:00 PM for a conversation about Canada and the world.

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 Understanding the Taliban: What Do They Want?

Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm

Location: Middle East Institute – 1319 18th Street NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: While peace negotiations with the Taliban have gained momentum, many questions remain unanswered about their vision for Afghanistan’s future. How have the Taliban evolved over the past 17 years? What do they aim to achieve in the current negotiations? Who makes the decisions, and does their negotiating team represent the broader Taliban movement, much less other elements of the insurgency? Why is the militant group willing to negotiate with the U.S. but not with the Afghan government? Also, what assurances are there that the Taliban will honor their promises, including those involving human rights and the presence of terrorist groups on the Afghan soil? Would the Taliban settle for sharing power, or is it aiming to monopolize power? Most important, are the Taliban’s goals for Afghanistan compatible with the principles of a democratic constitutional order?

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Russia’s Ideological Ecosystems: What Are the Interactions between Nationalists and the Kremlin?

Time: 3:00pm – 4:00pm

Location: 5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Far from being the ideological monolith often described by Western pundits, the Russian regime nurtures ideological diversity. In her latest monograph, Russian Nationalism: Imaginaries, Doctrines and Political Battlefields, Marlene Laruelle explores the different ideological “ecosystems” that co-exist and compete for resources and attention in today’s Russia. She will particularly discuss the place of Russian nationalists and how they interact within these intellectual ecosystems, as well as with the Kremlin itself.

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Vulnerability and Resilience of Young People in Kyrgyzstan: Radicalization, Violence, and Extremism

Time: 4:00pm – 5:30pm

Location: Voesar Conf. Room, Suite 412 – Elliott School of International Affairs, 1957 E Street, NW 

Information: This nationwide research project explores what makes young people in Kyrgyzstan more vulnerable or more resilient to radicalization, violence, and extremism. This was done using an extensive toolkit of research methods and a wide range of quantitative and qualitative research tools. The analysis was conducted in five domains of young people’s lives connected to radicalization in Kyrgyzstan is a very complex phenomenon connected to many aspects of young people’s lives: each domain produces a unique connection radicalization, and there are many connections across domains.

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Democratic Backsliding in Europe?

Time: 4:30pm – 6:00pm

Location: ICC Room 450 – 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20007

Information: The political trends in Hungary, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia poses urgent questions about the future of democracy. Do these countries find themselves on a slippery slope towards “illiberal democracy” and why? Is there a specific “regional” explanation for the democratic deficit in Central and Eastern Europe? What particular interests aim at “state capture”? Professor Karolewski holds a chair in political science at the Willy Brandt Center at Wroclaw University, Poland. His areas of emphasis are European integration, political theory, and nationalism. His current research revolves around populism, citizenship and migration, and democratic backsliding.

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Friday, February 22nd

Prospects for the Trump-Kim Vietnam Summit

Time: 10:00am – 12:00pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Please join us for a timely discussion with scholars, experts, and opinion leaders on the potential impact of the February 27 and 28, 2019 Vietnam Summit between the United States and North Korea, the possibilities for denuclearization, and regional implications of summit diplomacy for Northeast Asia.

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Cross-Strait Relations and the Future of Taiwan

Time: 12:30pm – 2:00pm

Location: ICC 302-P – 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20007

Information: In a New Year’s speech delivered on the fortieth anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic ties between the People’s Republic of China and the United States, Chinese President Xi Jinping warned Taiwan (and the United States) that unification must be the ultimate goal of any talks over its future and efforts to assert full independence could be met by armed force. He also suggested that China and Taiwan could operate under the “one country, two systems” model that China has practiced with Hong Kong and Macau. However, as soon as Xi’s speech was published, Taiwanese President Tsai also made a public speech firmly rejecting President Xi’s proposal, publicly rejecting the “1992 Consensus” for the first time stating “…Taiwan absolutely will not accept “one country, two systems.” What does this mean for the future of cross-Strait relations and Taiwan’s democracy? Please join the Asian Studies Program as we address these questions among others with Professor Shelley Rigger, Brown Professor of East Asian Politics at Davidson College. The event will be moderated by Professor Robert Wang, former Deputy Director of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) and current adjunct professor in the Asian Studies Program.

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Dr. Curtis Ryan: Reform, Resistance, and Refugees: Jordan and the Arab Uprisings

Time: 12:30pm – 2:00pm

Location: CCAS Boardroom – ICC 141 [Enter through ICC 241] – 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20007

Information: The Center for Contemporary Arab Studies invites you to a presentation, Reform, Resistance, and Refugees: Jordan and the Arab Uprisings, by Dr. Curtis Ryan. The presentation will be based on Dr. Ryan’s latest book, Jordan and the Arab Uprisings: Regime Survival and Politics Beyond the State. Curtis Ryan is a professor in the Department of Government and Justice Studies at Appalachian State University. He received his B.A. in history and political science from Drew University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His areas of interest and expertise include international relations and foreign policy; international and regional security; comparative politics; Middle East politics; and inter-Arab relations and alliance politics. Ryan served as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Jordan and was twice named a Peace Scholar by the United States Institute of Peace. He is also a prolific writer, contributing to journals such as Middle East Report, Middle East Journal, and Arab Studies Quarterly, and is the author of two books on Jordanian government and foreign policy. In Jordan and the Arab Uprisings, Dr. Curtis Ryan analyzes Jordanian political culture from Islamist and leftist opposition parties to youth movements and other forms of activism, as well as struggles over elections, reform, and identity. Detailing regime survival strategies, Dr. Ryan lays out how the monarchy has held out the possibility of reform while also seeking to co-opt and contain its opponents. While the Arab Spring may be over, Ryan shows that political activism in Jordan is not. Drawing on extensive fieldwork and interviews with a vast range of people, from grassroots activists to King Abdullah II, Jordan and the Arab Uprisings is a definitive analysis of Jordanian politics before, during, and beyond the Arab uprisings.

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Russia Abroad

Time: 1:30pm – 3:00pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: The collapse of the Soviet Union left Russia encircled by weak states and fractured regions. Some of the divisions around Russia’s periphery are legacies of the Soviet Union and the Russian Empire. Others are the result of contemporary political and economic divides. From Balkans to Central Asia and the Middle East, Russia seeks to manipulate these fractures to strengthen its own influence.

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