Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 03/04 – 03/08

Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 03/04 – 03/08

Monday, March 4th

Whose Rules? Digital Governance and the Pursuit of Technological Leadership

Time: 2:00pm – 4:30pm
Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036
Information: A fragmented model of digital governance is emerging. Data regulation, technical and ethical standards, and market leadership are all in flux, raising questions about whose rules, if any, will become the global standard. This CSIS Simon Chair event will look at the evolution of technology and digital governance in the world’s major economies – the United States, Europe, China, and Japan – and how competing visions and differing priorities are shaping national and regional approaches to digital governance. Featuring a keynote address from Representative Suzan DelBene (D-WA)
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Taiwan-U.S.-China Relations: A Discussion with Cheng Wen-Tsan

Time: 2:15pm – 4:00pm
Location: Hudson Institute, Stern Policy Center, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004
Information: Hudson Institute will host a discussion on Taiwan-U.S.-China relations with Mayor Cheng Wen-Tsan, of Taoyuan, one of Taiwan’s largest cities. China-Taiwan relations are among the most complex and controversial in the world. The two entities, while sharing heritage and a language, have very different aspirations.
Despite efforts to resist China’s pressure for reunification, Taiwan’s economy is tightly linked with that of the mainland. The United States maintains formal commitments to Taiwan’s security, vibrant democracy, and its geostrategic position in the region. Mayor Cheng’s expertise in the country’s economics and information technology capabilities give him a unique perspective on relations between Taiwan, the U.S., and China. The mayor will also discuss Taiwan’s role in the U.S.-Indo-Pacific strategy.
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Pakistani Ambassador to U.S. Dr. Asad Majeed Khan on Pakistan’s Priorities

Time: 3:00pm – 4:30pm
Location: U.S. Institute of Peace, Asia Center – 2301 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20037
Information: Over the past several months, the United States and Pakistan have increased their diplomatic engagement in order to advance prospects for Afghan peace and reconciliation. Pakistan appears to be pressing the Taliban to engage in peace talks, though the scope and scale of this pressure are unknown. Meanwhile, tensions between India and Pakistan have risen sharply in the aftermath of a deadly attack against Indian security personnel in Kashmir claimed by a Pakistan-based militant group. This regional turmoil could undermine progress in the Afghan peace track and increase the likelihood of large-scale escalation.
Recently arrived Pakistani Ambassador to the U.S., Dr. Asad Majeed Khan, will discuss Pakistan’s policy responses to recent developments and his priorities for the U.S.-Pakistan relationship. Please join us for this timely discussion on Monday, March 4 from 3:00 – 4:30pm at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #USIPPakistan.

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Russian Politics and the Strategy of the Russian Opposition

Time: 3:00pm – 4:30pm
Location: Elliott School of International Affairs, 1957 E Street, NW, Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
Information: In this presentation, Leonid Volkov, Chief of Staff and Campaign Manager for Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny, will reflect on the current political situation in Russia, its future development, and where the opposition to Putin’s regime should seek its best chances to overcome the status quo.
Leonid Volkov is a Russian politician with Russia’s Future Party. Volkov was Campaign Manager and Chief of Staff for Alexei Navalny’s 2013 Moscow mayoral campaign; he also worked with Alexy Navalny on his attempt to register for the 2018 presidential election. Currently, Leonid Volkov oversees all regional political operations of the Future Party over Russia’s 11 time zones. He is a former deputy of the Yekaterinburg City Duma and the head of the Central Election Committee of the Russian Opposition Coordination Council. Leonid Volkov has over 20 years of experience as an IT professional, running, and consulting for, several of Russia’s largest software firms. Together with Fyodor Krasheninnikov, he published three editions of The Cloud Democracy, a book on how modern technology can re-shape and re-define democracy and elections. Volkov is also founder of the Internet Protection Society, an NGO focused on internet freedom and digital rights in Russia.
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The Diplomacy of Détente: Cooperative Security from Schmidt to Shultz

Time: 4:00pm – 5:30pm
Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004
Information: Stephan Kieninger’s book looks into Helmut Schmidt’s and George Shultz’s statecraft and into their contributions to the longevity of détente in Europe amidst international crisis. Kieninger argues that Schmidt and Shultz managed to maintain cooperatives security policies towards the Soviet Union finding a delicate balance between détente and deterrence against the backdrop of the Euromissile Crisis. Détente survived, it blossomed under Reagan and Gorbachev, and it had a substantial stake in the peaceful demise of the Soviet Union. Stephan Kieninger is a post-doctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins SAIS. He obtained his Ph.D. from Mannheim University. Kieninger’s current research investigates the role of Western financial aid for the Soviet Union and its impact for the emergence of the new global order. He published two books: The Diplomacy of Détente. Cooperative Security Policies from Helmut Schmidt to George Shultz (London: Routledge, 2018) and Dynamic Détente. The United States and Europe, 1964-1975 (Lanham (MD), Rowman & Littlefield, 2016).
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Tuesday, March 5th

The Return of Syrian Refugees: Social and Economic Considerations

Time: 12:30pm – 2:00pm

Location: The Middle East Institute, 1319 18th St NW, Washington, DC, 20036
Information: The Middle East Institute (MEI) is pleased to host a public release of the World Bank’s new report, “The Mobility of Displaced Syrians: An Economic and Social Analysis.” This report examines key factors behind the return of more than 100,000 Syrian refugees and analyzes the various challenges and risks refugees must navigate as they consider a return home.
What are the conditions enabling the return of Syrian refugees to Syria? How could the future returns differ from the returns that have taken place so far? Which policy options does the international community have to support Syrian refugees, their hosts, and Syrians in Syria?
To present the report’s findings are World Bank Regional Director for the Mashreq Saroj Kumar Jha and lead author of the report and Senior Economist Harun Onder. Joining the discussion is U.S. Institute of Peace Senior Advisor Mona Yacoubian. MEI Senior Vice President Amb. Gerald Feierstein will moderate the discussion.
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Fusing national and subnational climate action to enhance global ambition: America’s Pledge and the case of the US

Time: 12:30pm – 2:00pm

Location: Room 806, 1619 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Information: A globally sufficient response to climate change will require new models of organization, coalition building, and implementation in which rapid decarbonization at the national level will be rooted in actions initiated by a diverse range of actors. The U.S. provides a window into how the diversification of climate action across actors can drive changes in emissions. We developed a new analytical approach to integrate sub-national commitments into a modeling framework to assess impacts across three politically plausible scenarios formulated in consultation with experts and stakeholders. These coalitions of actors in the U.S. are globally significant, equivalent to the world’s third largest economy and fourth largest GHG emitter. 
Moreover, politically plausible actions by non-federal actors could reduce national emissions as much as 24% below 2005 levels by 2025, close to the U.S. commitment of 26-28%. Such approaches to understanding the fusing of subnational into national ambition will be essential for all countries – building on this year’s UN climate summit to enhance global action by 2020. 
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Wednesday, March 6th

A Conversation with Karin Olofsdotter, Ambassador of Sweden to the United States of America

Time: 9:00am – 10:30am

Location: Elliott School of International Affairs, 1957 E Street, NW, Rm 505
Information: This event will focus on Sweden’s foreign and security policy: how a medium-sized, highly internationalized, but militarily non-aligned country in Northern Europe builds security and prosperity; why multilateralism is important to Sweden; and why a rules-based international order isn’t just a “buzz word,” but something existential. Ambassador Olofsdotter will talk about why the European Union is Sweden’s main foreign policy platform and what EU membership has brought to both Sweden and Europe. In addition, she will discuss the importance of increased cooperation between the EU and the US when responding to joint challenges.
Karin Olofsdotter took up her post as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Kingdom of Sweden to the United States of America on September 1, 2017. Before her assignment to Washington, DC, she served as Director-General for Trade at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs in Sweden since September 1, 2016. Ambassador Olofsdotter also previously held the position of Deputy Director-General and Head of the Department for Promotion of Sweden, Trade and CSR in Stockholm. Ms. Olofsdotter served as Sweden’s Ambassador to Hungary from 2011 to August 2014. Between 2008 and 2011, she served as Deputy Chief of Mission at the Swedish Embassy in Washington DC, where she was responsible for coordinating work at the Embassy. She entered the Foreign Service in 1994, and served as Chief of Staff to several Swedish Foreign Ministers and as Director of the Ministers Office in Stockholm before joining the Embassy in Washington. Her first posting was in Moscow, Russia, where she was mainly responsible for covering Belarus. She also worked at the Swedish delegation to NATO.
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After the Trump-Kim summit 2.0: What’s next for US policy on North Korea

Time: 9:30am – 11:00am

Location: Brookings Institution – Falk Auditorium, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20036
Information: The summit meeting between President Donald Trump and North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un on February 27 and 28 in Vietnam brought the two leaders together for the second time in less than a year. U.S.-North Korea negotiations on nuclear issues have been at a stalemate since the first summit in Singapore that touted lofty but vague goals. What results did the second summit yield?
On March 6, the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at Brookings will host a distinguished panel of experts for a discussion on the Trump-Kim summit in Hanoi. The speakers will offer observations and analyses of the summit, address the implications for and potential next steps in U.S.-North Korea relations, and what this means for denuclearization of North Korea, inter-Korean relations, and the U.S.-ROK alliance. After the session, panelists will take audience questions.
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The India-Pakistan Crisis: What Next?

Time: 10:00am – 11:00am

Location: By phone – U.S. toll-free #: 888-942-8140
Information: India and Pakistan have experienced their most serious crisis in nearly 20 years. After a Pakistan-based terror group staged an attack in India-administered Kashmir that killed more than 40 Indian security personnel, India retaliated by staging air strikes in Pakistan and Pakistan responded with its own strike on Indian targets. Pakistan also captured an Indian air force pilot. While Islamabad’s decision to release the pilot may offer a path toward de-escalation, the mood remains tense for the nuclear-armed rivals.
This Ground Truth Briefing will examine the implications of the crisis, what it means for regional stability, and what, if any, role should be played by the United States moving forward.
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Digital Freedom in Russia

Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 4th Floor – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Internet freedom in Russia is an important battleground, especially after Vladimir Putin’s recent attempts to create a “sovereign internet” that is overseen by the government. But civil society continues to challenge such attempts. Leonid Volkov, the founder of the Internet Protection Society and an IT-expert with over twenty years of professional experience, reflects on the Kremlin’s latest attempts on putting the “Runet” under its control and why he remains optimistic about the Runet’s future.
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Building Peaceful, Just and Inclusive Societies Amid a World on Fire: Mobilizing the International Community to Achieve SDG16+

Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm

Location: U.S. Institute of Peace, Policy, Learning and Strategy Center – 2301 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20037
Information: As we recently celebrated the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, we are conscious that violent conflicts cause unacceptable levels of civilian casualties, atrocities and abuses in fragile states. Disparities run deep and are intensified by conflict and violence. The most unequal societies are often the most violent. Weak institutions, rampant corruption, and high levels of exclusion fuel insecurity and damage communities and economies. More than half of the world’s poorest people are projected to live in fragile states by 2030. 
Sustainable Development Goal 16.1 promises to “significantly reduce all forms of violence” everywhere, but lethal violence is expected to rise by 2030 according to current trends. This is not inevitable. We have compelling evidence to show that conflict and violence can be prevented through multisectoral action to resolve disputes, strengthen institutions, tackle exclusion, and invest in human potential.
At a time of global peril, join the Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy in Washington, New York University’s Center on International Cooperation, and the U.S. Institute of Peace for a lively panel discussion on how to mobilize behind a roadmap that will put peace at the heart of the 2030 Agenda. Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #SDG16.

 

BOTTOM-UP POLITICS: What Do We Know and Where Do We Need to Go?

Time: 2:00pm – 5:00pm

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004
Information: Bottom-up politics responds to the current dysfunction in national governance with its damaging consequences for residents in both urban and rural communities throughout the nation. Partisan gridlock and protracted inattention to everyday problems are spurring communities to bring together problem-solving efforts of their own. Termed by New York Times columnist David Brooks “a localist revolution,” these initiatives bridge partisan, sector and social divides. Found in places varied in size, geography and partisan leanings, bottom-up politics is in need of sustained exploration. This symposium examines the processes and practices of local problem solving in which communities gather evidence, build coalitions, display creativity and often increase their efforts in scale and breadth.
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The Financial Markets of the Arab Gulf: Power, Politics and Money

Time: 2:30pm – 4:00pm

Location: The Middle East Institute, 1319 18th St NW, Washington, DC, 20036
Information: The Middle East Institute (MEI) and the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center are pleased to host a discussion with Jean-François Seznec and Samer Mosis, authors of The Financial Markets of the Arab Gulf: Power, Politics and Money. In their book, Seznec and Mosis assess the establishment and operations of institutions like the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority, the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority, and more. The book examines the relationship between the state and financial institutions in the Gulf, while critically surveying their role within the global market. 
Joining the discussion is the Atlantic Council Global Energy Center’s associate director, Bina Hussein. The panel will address several key questions surrounding the future of Gulf economies. How do Saudi Arabia’s financial institutions differ from those of other Gulf countries? What are the different diversification strategies implemented in the Gulf? How will the growth of Gulf markets affect citizens of these countries?
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Europe, multilateralism, and great power competition

Time: 4:30pm – 5:45pm
Location: Brookings Institution – Falk Auditorium, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20036

Information: On March 6, the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings will host Secretary-General of the European Commission Martin Selmayr for a discussion on the future of the European Union and multilateral engagement in an era of great power competition. As the European Commission’s top civil servant since March 2018, Selmayr heads the executive arm of the European Union, which oversees the design and implementation of the European Commission’s political priorities.
In a keynote address, Selmayr will discuss how the EU upholds multilateralism and the rules-based international order in a contested global environment. He will also address developments around the upcoming European Parliament elections, the EU’s long-term budget, and Brexit. Following Selmayr’s remarks, Brookings Senior Fellow and Director of the Center on the United States and Europe Thomas Wright will join him on stage for a conversation on these themes. Questions from the audience will follow the discussion.
This discussion is part of the Brookings – Robert Bosch Foundation Transatlantic Initiative, which aims to build up and expand resilient networks and trans-Atlantic activities to analyze and work on issues concerning trans-Atlantic relations and social cohesion in Europe and the United States.
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Thursday, March 7th

Sustainable Development Goal #17: Partnerships for the Goals

Time: 10:00am – 11:30am

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036
Information: Please join us on March 7th for a discussion of Sustainable Development Goal#17 which aims to strengthen global partnerships to support and achieve the ambitious targets of the 2030 Agenda, bringing together national governments, the international community, civil society, the private sector, and other actors.
After rapidly increasing for many years, official development assistance (ODA) has remained relatively constant for the last five years. Without significant increases in ODA, developing countries will need to identify new sources of development finance in order to meet growing and changing global challenges. Private sector and development finance institution (DFI) spending will soon make up a much larger percentage of development assistance than ODA. Current public-sector funding cannot (and should not) close the $2.5 trillion annual investment gap necessary for reaching the sustainable development goals (SDGs), nor is the public sector as adept at scaling impact and growth across emerging markets. What are the opportunities for public-private partnerships to meet the SDGs? How can blended finance be used to increase financing for the goals?
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Revolution and Civil Unrest: Lessons From Venezuela and Syria

Time: 11:45am – 1:30pm

Location: Hudson Institute, Stern Policy Center, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004
Information: Hudson Institute will host a discussion analyzing the similarities between the Syrian revolution and the civil war that followed and the recent unrest in Venezuela. Panelists will include Hudson Senior Fellow Michael Pregent; Institute of World Politics Research Professor Paul Coyer; Foundation for Defense of Democracies Freedom Scholar Michael Ledeen; and Center for a Secure Free Society Executive Director Joseph M. Humire. The discussion will be moderated by Middle East Broadcasting Networks President Alberto M. Fernandez.
Many of the challenges leading up to a revolution, as well as the consequences that come from political upheaval, remain consistent across countries and continents – the unrest in Venezuela and Syria are no exception. Refugees from the chaos and upheaval in Venezuela have exceeded 3 million and are quickly approaching levels associated with the Syrian refugee crisis, overwhelming neighboring countries. Similarly, the revolutions have evoked analogous anti-imperialist economic and social rhetoric in their movements. Understanding one country’s struggles can lend valuable insights for addressing another.
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Implications of the U.S.-North Korea Summit

Time: 1:15pm – 3:15pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036
Information: In the aftermath of the Hanoi Summit, please join CSIS for a special speech by Senator Cory Gardner (R-CO) to assess the outcome of the summit between the United States and North Korea. The Senator’s speech will be preceded by a panel of distinguished experts.
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Women’s Economic Empowerment and the Peace Corps – A Conversation with Dr. Jody Olsen, Peace Corps Director

Time: 5:30pm – 6:30pm
Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: In celebration of International Women’s Day, please join the Center for Strategic and International Studies for a Smart Women, Smart Power conversation with Dr. Jody Olsen, Peace Corps Director. She will discuss the importance of the Peace Corps as a development agency and its work on women’s economic empowerment. Olsen was sworn into office as the 20th Director of the Peace Corps in March 2018. Prior to returning to the Peace Corps in 2018, she served as Visiting Professor at the University of Maryland – Baltimore School of Social Work and Director of the University’s Center for Global Education Initiatives.
Dr. Olsen began her career as a Peace Corps Volunteer, serving in Tunisia from 1966-1968. She has since served in the agency in multiple leadership positions – as Acting Director in 2009; Deputy Director from 2002-2009; Chief of Staff from 1989-1992; Regional Director, North Africa, Near East, Asia, Pacific from 1981-1984; and Country Director in Togo from 1979-1981.
She also oversaw health research projects in Malawi while teaching courses on international social work, global social policy, and global women and children’s health. Throughout her career, Dr. Olsen has championed the expansion of service, learning, and international opportunities for Americans of all backgrounds.
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Friday, March 8th

Overcoming Violence: A Conversation with the 2019 International Women of Courage

Time: 10:00am – 11:30am

Location: Elliott School of International Affairs, 1957 E Street, NW, City View Room, 7th Floor
Information: Join members of the Elliott School of International Affairs and the Gender Equality Initiative in International Affairs to help recognize the 2019 Secretary of State’s International Women of Courage (IWOC) awardees.
The IWOC award recognizes women around the globe who have demonstrated exceptional courage and leadership in advocating for peace, justice, human rights, gender equality, and women’s empowerment, often at great personal risk and sacrifice. Following the official award ceremony and meetings in Washington, D.C., the IWOC honorees embark on an International Visitor Leadership Program to collaborate with American organizations across the United States. Through IWOC, now in its thirteenth year, the U.S. Department of State has honored over 120 courageous women from more than 60 countries.
This panel, hosted at The Elliott School, will be comprised of three 2019 IWOC awardees in conversation with Ambassador Reuben Brigety, Dean of the Elliott School. We invite the public to hear about these courageous women’s experiences and interact with them through a Q&A.
(Seating will be limited and on a first come first serve basis. Please come early to enjoy a light breakfast.)

Strategic Litigation in Russia: The Case of Bioethics

Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 5th Floor – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004
Information: Strategic litigation aims to use specific court cases to develop new legal norms and create broad legal and social change beyond the decisions in the individual cases themselves. The individual cases can be used as tools to obtain justice for an entire class of people who are disproportionately affected by the unjust law. Anton Burkov, Director of the Strategic Litigation Center, will discuss how these strategies have influenced the Russian legal system in the context of his work on bioethics issues that have arisen in the past five years.
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Venezuela on Fire: The Trump Administration Faces Crisis in Latin America

Time: 11:45am – 1:30pm

Location: Hudson Institute, Stern Policy Center, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004
Information: Hudson Institute will host a discussion on the crisis in Venezuela and the future of the Latin America. The panel will be introduced by the director of Hudson Institute’s Center for Latin American Studies, Ambassador Jaime Daremblum, followed by an expert panel moderated by Hudson Institute senior fellow Lee Smith.
The Trump White House has won bipartisan support and multilateral backing abroad for its recent Venezuela policy. While issuing unequivocal demands that President Nicolás Maduro step down and recognize national assembly leader and interim President Juan Guaidó, the administration has sent humanitarian assistance through the Colombian border to provide assistance to those in the region affected by the crisis.
However, many fear that skirmishes between pro-Maduro forces and the opposition may be a harbinger of worse to come. Some wonder if Venezuela is on the brink of civil war. If so, a political crisis in one of the Western hemisphere’s major energy producers will likely reverberate throughout the Americas and world markets. Decades of socialist policies designed to enrich corrupt “boligarchs” have impoverished the country while uprooting its political processes and tearing at its social fabric.
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#HerPotentialOurFuture: Gender Equality, Fragility and Conflict-Affected States

Time: 10:00am – 11:00am

Location: U.S. Institute of Peace, Policy, Learning and Strategy Center – 2301 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20037
Information: Recent decades have seen huge gains in progress on empowering women and girls but we are still far from achieving gender equality. And nowhere is this more true than in fragile and conflict-affected states, where often it is the women and girls who face the greatest challenges. Join UK Secretary of State, Penny Mordaunt, to hear her views on empowering women and girls, recognizing that it is only by unlocking women’s potential that we will build a safer, more peaceful and more prosperous world for us all, and achieve the ambitious agenda set out by the Global Goals.