Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 03/18 – 03/22

Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 03/18 – 03/22

Monday, March 18th

Europe’s Expanding Role in the Indo-Pacific

Time: 11:45am – 1:30pm

Location: Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C. Headquarters, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Hudson Institute will host a discussion on Europe’s growing presence in the Indo-Pacific region. Panelists will include Dr. Patrick M. Cronin, Asia-Pacific Security chair at Hudson Institute; Dr. John Hemmings, deputy director of research and director of the Asia Studies Centre at the Henry Jackson Society; Dr. Aparna Pande, director of Hudson’s Initiative on the Future of India and South Asia; Liselotte Odgaard, visiting senior fellow at Hudson Institute; and Dr. Satoru Nagao, a Hudson Institute visiting fellow. Europe’s presence in the Indo-Pacific is on the rise. Recent announcements suggest the UK plans to dispatch one of its aircraft carriers to the Pacific and is considering establishing a series of new bases in the region. Meanwhile, France is working with Japan to address mutual regional concerns and is discussing the possibility of holding bilateral exercises with the Japanese military. Both France and the UK are increasing their overall naval presence in Asia-Pacific, which has been welcomed by allies, but spurned by others, particularly China. Yet both countries continue to reinforce regional alliances that in the long term will strengthen Europe’s strategic position in the region.

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The Immigration Challenge in a Divided Europe

Time: 5:00pm – 6:30pm

Location: The Brookings Institution, Falk Auditorium, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20036

Information: On March 18, the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings will host François Héran for the 14th annual Raymond Aron Lecture. In his remarks, Dr. Héran will discuss the ongoing immigration debate in Europe through a sociological and demographic lens. He will offer analysis on the development and politicization of this debate in an increasingly divided Europe, and present actionable recommendations for policymakers going forward. Following Dr. Héran’s address, Georgetown University Adjunct Professor Anne C. Richard, who served as assistant secretary of state for population, refugees, and migration during the Obama administration, will respond to his remarks. Dr. François Héran is the Migrations and Societies Chair at the Collège de France in Paris, and has published extensively on sociology, demography, and migration. He is the founder and director of the interdisciplinary Institut des Migrations, under the auspices of the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), and he previously served over 10 years as head of the French National Institute for Demographic Research (INED). Brookings President John R. Allen will provide welcome remarks. Brookings Visiting Fellow Célia Belin will moderate the discussion. After the program, panelists will take audience questions.

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Tuesday, March 19th

Nicaraguan Tragedy: From Consensus to Coercion

Time: 9:00am – 11:00am

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Nicaragua has enjoyed better than average economic growth and expanding opportunity over the past two decades in large part because of political stability and the economic consensus that has existed between the government and private sector. But the increasingly authoritarian tendencies of the government of President Daniel Ortega have undermined its legitimacy, leading to a sudden and sustained political crisis over the last year that has unraveled the economy and that threatens the country’s future. 

Nicaragua is at a turning point. Governance capacities can catch up to economic performance, to construct a model of open, democratic capitalism with social inclusion. Alternatively, the country can regress into the dark abyss of political repression and economic misery. The renewal of the national dialogue, this time with more rational, promising procedures, raises hopes that Nicaragua will find a positive path forward. 

Please join us for a discussion about Nicaragua’s economy over the last 25 years and how Nicaragua’s private sector can contribute to resolving the current political crisis and reestablishing economic growth.

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The Inaugural Theory and Practice of Security Conference: Nuclear Weapons and International Security

Time: 9:00am – 4:30pm

Location: Lohrfink Auditorium, Hariri Building 2nd Floor, Georgetown University

Information: What do we really know about the impact of nuclear weapons on international relations? What are the best theories and explanations for state behavior in the shadow of nuclear war, and how well do they help us understand history and contemporary geopolitics? This conference brings together top nuclear experts – international relations scholars, historians, and policy practitioners – to discuss and debate the theory and practice of nuclear strategy, deterrence, and arms control. Join the Center for Security Studies for a day of conversations with scholars and practitioners alike, featuring a keynote address by Dr. John Mearsheimer on the role of great powers in the nuclear arena.

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The Ambassadors Series: The Romanian Presidency and the European Union

Time: 11:45am – 1:00pm

Location: Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C. Headquarters, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Hudson Institute will host Romanian Ambassador George Maior for a discussion on the Romanian presidency of the European Union. The conversation will be moderated by Walter Russell Mead, the Ravenel B. Curry III Distinguished Fellow in Strategy and Statesmanship at Hudson. 

Romania has begun its six-month presidency of the Council of the European Union at a critical juncture marked by the looming Brexit deadline, the upcoming European Parliament elections and continued security challenges on its Eastern border. Hudson is pleased to host Ambassador Maior as he discusses the agenda that Romania has set for the EU; its key role in defending the Black Sea and NATO’s eastern flank and in promoting energy security; and the future of the EU post-Brexit. 

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The New Arctic: Navigating the Realities, Possibilities, and Challenges

Time: 2:30pm – 4:00pm

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: It is well established that the Arctic is warming at an alarming rate and, as a result, the region has and will continue to experience dramatic changes, including: opportunities and challenges to Arctic and Indigenous communities; an increase in Arctic Ocean shipping activities; expanded opportunities for resource development; and the potential for conflict in what has been a region with low military tensions. Additionally, non-Arctic states have increased their interest and activities in the area, further underscoring the importance of the new global Arctic. The Wilson Center was pleased to participate, with colleagues from various organizations and programs, to inform a report by the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University. The report explores the new, dynamic Arctic and ways in which policies and partnerships may be developed to guide Arctic diplomacy in the decades to come. Please join us for a discussion on this report and key findings, and a reception after the event.

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 ACMCU & Rutgers Event: “Toward Empowerment and Sustainability – Reforming America’s Syrian Refugee Policy”

Time: 2:30pm – 4:00pm

Location: ACMCU Boardroom ICC 270, Georgetown University

 

Information: In this event, the Center for Security, Race and Rights, (CSRR) will launch their newly finalized report, Toward Empowerment and Sustainability: Reforming America’s Syrian Refugee Policy and will present their findings at a panel highlighting many of the themes within the report. CSRR’s Director, Dr. Sahar Aziz will spearhead the launch and participate in a panel discussion subsequent to the presentation. A brief excerpt from the findings of the report can be seen below: While media coverage has focused on Syrian refugees seeking asylum in third countries, such as Europe and the United States, eighty percent of the seven million externally displaced Syrians have sought refuge in the countries neighboring Syria: Jordan, Iraq, Turkey, Egypt, and Lebanon resulting in an enormous strain on government services and the local economies. As an influential player in Middle East politics, the United States has a national interest in sustaining the capacity of international systems to respond to protracted refugee crises. Toward that end, Toward Empowerment and Sustainability: Reforming America’s Syrian Refugee Policies examines Jordan as a case study for informing U.S. Syrian refugee policy. Jordan’s experience exemplifies the myriad challenges facing neighboring countries that warrant a rethinking of America’s approach to the Syrian refugee crisis.

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Women in International Affairs – An Intimate Conversation with Women Leaders

Time: 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Location: Elliott School of International Affairs, 1957 E Street, NW, Rm 113

Information: Join us for a discussion of women’s personal and professional experiences in the field. Speakers include former Ambassador to Yemen, Barbara Bodine, Counterpart International President, Joan Parker, and Mary Ellsberg of the Global Women’s Institute. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions, so come prepared!

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Wednesday, March 20th

The Aftermath of President Bolsonaro’s Visit to Washington and Prospects for Economic Reform

Time: 2:30pm – 5:00pm

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 5th Floor – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: President Jair Bolsonaro will make his first official visit to Washington as president from March 17-19, as the government looks to fulfill its promise of strengthening relations with the United States. Yet the most promising area of bilateral dialogue—economic and commercial relations, including greater U.S. investment in Brazil—will depend heavily on the new government’s capacity to deliver much-needed reforms at home, particularly the approval of meaningful pension reform in the Brazilian National Congress. Talk of a looming China-U.S. trade rapprochement could also create challenges during the presidential visit, not only for the new Brazilian government’s pro-Western agenda, but also because Brazil emerged as one of the largest beneficiaries of the China-U.S. trade dispute. 

Join us on March 20, one day after the conclusion of President Bolsonaro’s visit, for a two-part event examining prospects for the Brazilian economy, the current political environment, and Brazil-U.S. relations, three months into the new administration’s tenure.

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Schieffer Series: China’s Rise

Time: 5:00pm – 6:30pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: China’s rise has become a key point of inquiry in the discussion of the future of geopolitics and economy. This event will discuss China’s rise and its impact, both in the U.S. and globally. The panelists will discuss, specifically, how China’s domestic governance model has changed under the leadership of Xi Jinping, and what implications these changes have for the United States and the international community when dealing with China. Finally, the panelists will discuss China’s growing technological leadership, including in key areas such as 5G, and what China’s changing role among these industries means for the U.S. and the global community.

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Thursday, March 21st

Army Modernization: Priorities to get to the Army of 2028

Time: 8:00am – 9:00am

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: CSIS invites you to a conversation with Under Secretary of the Army Ryan D. McCarthy and Representative Anthony Brown (D-MD) to discuss the Army’s modernization efforts and how the Army will fight in the future.

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Securing the Peace in Oceania and the Pacific Islands

Time: 11:45am – 1:30pm

Location: Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C. Headquarters, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Hudson Institute will host a discussion on Oceania’s evolving strategic position in the Asia-Pacific region. The panel of experts will be moderated by Hudson Senior Fellow Eric Brown. Oceania and the Pacific Islands countries have rapidly become a key locus of the intensifying economic and security competition now unfolding across Maritime Asia. The last 40 years of liberal peace in Asia have been enormously beneficial to Pacific Rim countries, particularly China, but less so for many Pacific Island countries. Geographically isolated, many of these countries face severe economic and governance issues—as well as policy neglect by the Pacific Rim’s advanced democracies. In recent years, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has dramatically enlarged its economic involvement throughout Oceania. This state-directed expansion is generating high levels of indebtedness among some Pacific Islands countries to China, and the PRC now appears intent on translating this into strategic leverage. How can Japan, Australia, New Zealand, the U.S., and other advanced Pacific Rim democracies best cooperate to upgrade the liberal peace in Oceania, and promote commerce and connectivity based on Rule of Law and good governance that benefits the peoples of the Pacific Islands?

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Finding your Global Network

Time: 12:30pm – 1:00pm

Location: ICC 302-P, Georgetown University

Information: Social media platforms such as LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter offer unique opportunities for international students to explore career paths, connect with potential mentors with shared heritage or career goals, and uncover internship and job opportunities before they are advertised on traditional job boards. Join us for a workshop to learn how, as a global learner, you can leverage LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook to learn how to present your skills in the language of your industry of interest, how to approach like-minded professionals online, and how to uncover and best compete for opportunities in the US and around the world.

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Thirst For Power: Film Screening for the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital

Time: 12:00pm – 2:00pm

 

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: The Wilson Center’s China Environment Forum and the Environmental Change and Security Program are excited to host a film screening for the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital (March 14-24). This year we are screening a new documentary, Thirst for Power, on March 21 that takes a deep dive into water-energy confrontations facing our planet. For thousands of years, water has been key to civilization and in the modern era, we increasingly use water to make energy — and use considerable energy to bring us clean water. Water shortages can mean shutdowns for coal and nuclear power plants while some cities struggle with the costs to supply enough energy for wastewater treatment and pumping groundwater. The documentary is adapted by filmmaker Mat Hames from Dr. Michael E. Webber’s book, Thirst for Power: Energy, Water, and Human Survival. Combining anecdotes and personal stories from around the world with insights into the latest science of energy and water, the film identifies a hopeful path toward wise long-range water-energy decisions and a more reliable and abundant future for humanity. Following the film, Mat will join the China Environment Forum’s Director Jennifer Turner, who has managed the Wilson Center’s water-energy initiative, Global Chokepoint, for 8 years, for a discussion of the film.

No RSVP, First come first serve for seating


Ungovernable Life: Mandatory Medicine and Statecraft in Iraq with Omar Dewachi

Time: 5:00pm – 6:30pm

 

Location: Elliott School of International Affairs, 1957 E Street, NW, Rm 505

Information: Iraq’s healthcare has been on the edge of collapse since the 1990s. Once the leading hub of scientific and medical training in the Middle East, Iraq’s political and medical infrastructure has been undermined by decades of U.S.-led sanctions and invasions. Since the British Mandate, Iraqi governments had invested in cultivating Iraq’s medical doctors as agents of statecraft and fostered connections to scientists abroad. In recent years, this has been reversed as thousands of Iraqi doctors have left the country in search of security and careers abroad. Ungovernable Life presents the untold story of the rise and fall of Iraqi “mandatory medicine”—and of the destruction of Iraq itself.

Trained as a doctor in Baghdad, Omar Dewachi writes a medical history of Iraq, offering readers a compelling exploration of state-making and dissolution in the Middle East. His work illustrates how imperial modes of governance, from the British Mandate to the U.S. interventions, have been contested, maintained, and unraveled through medicine and healthcare. In tracing the role of doctors as agents of state-making, he challenges common accounts of Iraq’s alleged political unruliness and ungovernability, bringing forth a deeper understanding of how medicine and power shape life and how decades of war and sanctions dismember projects of state-making.

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Friday, March 22nd

Women Leading Nonviolent Peace Movements: Lessons from Afghanistan, Libya, Syria, Uganda and Venezuela

Time: 9:30am – 11:30am

Location: U.S. Institute of Peace – 2301 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20037

Information: Women have often been the invisible actors in history—sidelined from formal political and social spaces—but creating their own spaces for change through engaging in nonviolent resistance. Research shows that movements with active women’s participation are more likely to maintain nonviolent discipline and achieve their goals. From fighting for human rights in Venezuela to protesting unconstitutional amendments in Uganda, women leaders of nonviolent movements have proven to be key actors for peace.

Women’s leadership in nonviolent movements creates opportunities for new and diverse tactics and often ensures a diversity of participation, increasing a movement’s power. But, women also face specific challenges, such as balancing their activism with their roles at home and the workplace, their vulnerability to sexual abuse, and challenging perceptions of powerlessness.

To celebrate National Women’s History Month, the U.S. Institute of Peace and the 2020 One Woman, One Vote Festival will host an intergenerational discussion among women nonviolent activists. To strengthen future nonviolent movements, leaders must learn from the past challenges and successes. Women leaders from Libya, Syria, Uganda, Afghanistan, the U.S. and Venezuela will speak from their experiences as activists for social change on the challenges they faced as women and how they organize to overcome them.

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The end of an era? The INF Treaty, New START, and the future of strategic stability

Time: 10:00am – 11:30am

 

Location: Brookings Institution, Saul/Zilkha Room,1775 Massachusetts Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20036

Information: On February 1, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that the United States would suspend its obligations under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, and that pursuant to Article XV of the treaty, the United States would withdraw from the treaty in six months. In response to the announcement, Russian President Vladimir Putin stated that Russia would also suspend its obligations under the treaty. Unless something dramatic occurs, it appears that the INF Treaty, signed in 1987 by President Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev, will likely end this summer. What implications will the end of the INF treaty have for New START and the future of strategic stability? On March 22, the Foreign Policy program at Brookings will host a discussion involving experts and former government officials to explore this question and others. Following their conversation, panelists will take audience questions.

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Report Roll-Out: Illicit Trade and the Haitian-Dominican Republic Border

 

Time: 10:30am – 12:30pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Illegal trade across the Haiti/Dominican Republic border has serious financial and security implications. Contraband undermines legitimate business on both sides of the border and deprives the public sector – especially the cash-strapped government of Haiti – of much-needed revenues. It also undermines rule of law and public security by fueling corruption and strengthening criminal organizations. After two research trips to both Haiti and the Dominican Republic, CSIS Americas has produced a summary report of the issue of illicit border trade between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, incorporating several case studies and policy recommendations for preventing further cross-border illicit trade and revenue loss. Please join us on March 22 at 10:30 am for a public event to discuss the CSIS Americas report and the larger issues of trade between the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Additional speakers to be announced.

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Diverse Diplomacy Leaders series with Raj Wadhwani and Ana Escrogima

Time: 2:00pm – 3:30pm

 

Location: McGhee Library, Georgetown University

Information: Join us to listen to Raj Wadhwani, Deputy Director in the Office of Arabian Penninsula Affairs, and Ana Escrogima, Office Director for Regional and Multilateral Affairs, in the Near Eastern Affairs Bureau of the U.S. Department of State, share their insights on diversity and inclusion at the State Department and advice for diverse candidates considering a career in foreign policy. Note: due to space limitations, seating is on a first come, first served basis.

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