Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 03/25 – 03/29

Getting Downtown: International Affairs Events in DC 03/25 – 03/29

Monday, March 25th

Emerging Technology Trends and National Security

Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm

Location: The Newseum – Knight Television Studio, 555 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 

Information: Please join us for a discussion on emerging technology trends and national security with James A. Lewis, CSIS Senior Vice President and Director of the Technology Policy Program, and Edward Screven, Oracle’s Chief Corporate Architect, on Monday, March 25th from 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Jim Lewis and Edward Screven will discuss the unprecedented security risks being faced by the public and private sectors, and how the latest in emerging technology trends can mitigate these risks. This event will take place at the Newseum, and will be open to the public and press. Registration will be capped at 140 for this event. Please register through this webpage, and your registration will be confirmed via email. Guests should enter via the C Street, NW/Group Entrance. Doors open at 10:00 am. Light refreshments and beverages will be served. This event has been organized to comply with congressional gift rules as a “reception” (House Rule 25.5(a)(4)(A) & Senate Rule 35.1(c)(22)). Food and refreshments provided will be limited to a continental breakfast and beverages. Attendance at this event is at no cost to government personnel when appropriate under applicable laws and agency policies.

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The Ambassadors Series: A Discussion with Ambassador Danny Danon

Time: 11:45am – 1:00pm

Location: Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C. Headquarters, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Hudson Institute will host Israeli Ambassador to the United Nations Danny Danon for a discussion on U.S.-Israeli relations and Israeli foreign policy. The conversation will be moderated by Walter Russell Mead, the Ravenel B. Curry III distinguished fellow in strategy and statesmanship at Hudson.

 Despite a close relationship with the United States, Israel continues to face numerous regional challenges. The Islamic State’s loss of territorial control over large swathes of Syria and Iraq has improved some aspects of the counterterror situation, but Iranian and Russian consolidation in Syria is an unwelcome development. Despite the troubles in Israel’s backyard, the country has developed a new set of partnerships across Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Hudson Institute is pleased to welcome Ambassador Danon as he discusses the health of the U.S.-Israel relationship; the challenges and opportunities of the Middle East; and Israel’s foreign policy.

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Navigating China and the U.S.: A Conversation with Prime Minister José Ulisses de Pina Correia e Silva of Cabo Verde

Time: 12:30pm – 2:00pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters, 1st Floor, Rm 110 – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Cabo Verde navigates a complex array of foreign partnerships, balancing the interests of great powers like China, the U.S., and the EU. Chinese construction and financial assistance, predating now-widespread China-Africa engagement, was instrumental to the island nation’s development. At the same time, the African country also has a rich history of trade and bilateral migration with the U.S. and has signed a special partnership agreement with the EU. As its foreign partners vie for influence across Africa, questions surface regarding Cabo Verde’s longstanding and conflicting diplomatic ties. The Wilson Center and the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Africa Program invite you to join us for a conversation with H.E. José Ulisses de Pina Correia e Silva, Prime Minister of Cabo Verde, on Monday, March 25, 12:30-2:00 p.m. Judd Devermont (CSIS Africa Program) will join the prime minister to discuss Cabo Verde’s bilateral relations, particularly with China, and how the U.S. can support the country’s interests.

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Sudan Update: What is Happening and What Does It Mean?

Time: 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Location: CCAS Boardroom, Georgetown University – 3700 O Street, N.W., 241 Intercultural Center (ICC), Washington, DC 20057

Information: The Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University is pleased to present a panel of three experts on Sudan to share their takes on current events and the significance behind recent uprisings in the country. Curious about what is happening in Sudan and what the future holds for the nation? Whether you are well acquainted with Sudan or new to following recent Sudanese events, everyone will be sure to take away a lot from this panel.

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Tuesday, March 26th

Overcoming War Legacies: The Road to Reconciliation and Future Cooperation Between the United States and Vietnam

Time: 8:30am – 2:30pm

Location: Webcast only.

Information: Forged in the effort in the 1980s to account for missing Americans and assist Vietnamese suffering from war-related disabilities, cooperation between the former adversaries to heal the devastating consequences of the war expanded to include locating and removing unexploded ordnance, remediation of dioxin (Agent Orange) contamination at former U.S. airbases, and supporting health and disability programs for victims of Agent Orange. This decades-long, joint humanitarian effort to overcome the legacies of war has enabled the United States and Vietnam to achieve the normalization of post-war relations based on mutual respect. In recent years, it has expanded to shared interests encompassing diplomacy, trade, and regional security. Please join American and Vietnamese leaders and experts to explore this historic cooperative effort and the lessons it offers the world, as well as to discuss the future of U.S.-Vietnam relations. Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #USAVietnam.

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The Case for U.S. Foreign Assistance

Time: 1:30pm – 3:00pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters, 1st Floor, Rm 110 – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Senator Arthur Vandenberg, former Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee (1947-1949), was an important U.S. foreign policy advocate who nurtured bipartisan consensus on many issues in his time. He was the legislative architect of the Marshall Plan and was also instrumental in securing bipartisan support for NATO and the United Nations. The Marshall Plan and other initiatives that followed (such as the Alliance for Progress and USAID) were created in the context of great power competition. We are perhaps returning to an age of renewed great power competition. The developing world today is much richer, freer, and has more options. In this context, American foreign assistance is still needed, but in a radically changed world. Foreign assistance in the United States has always operated in the context of enlightened self-interest. In Senator Vandenberg’s time, there were significant critics of assistance who doubted the effectiveness of foreign aid just as there are today. How do we make the case for American foreign assistance in this new era? What are the major global challenges and opportunities that we might take advantage of by investing U.S. foreign assistance dollars? CSIS wants to honor the legacy of Senator Vandenberg’s contribution to public service by identifying areas of bipartisan agreement. This event will launch a project focused on “Building Bipartisan Solutions for Foreign Policy Issues: The Arthur Vandenberg Legacy Initiative.” Please join us for a public armchair discussion with Senator Norm Coleman (R) and Senator Tom Daschle (D).

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The Contours of Global Security: Border Lines, Critical Regions

Time: 1:30pm – 3:45pm

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: As debate rages in Washington over President Trump’s characterization of the situation at the southern U.S. border as a national security emergency, the risks and stakes in several hot-spot regions around the world are far less open to question. Join leading Wilson Center experts for a survey of the state of affairs at North America’s borders and in areas experiencing acute security crises, from Venezuela to North Korea to Syria.

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Long Game or Long Gone?

Time: 2:00pm – 3:00pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters, 2nd Floor Conference Center – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Please join the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Transnational Threats Project for a dialogue on counterterrorism with two of the world’s premier experts. Seth G. Jones, director of the Transnational Threats Project, will moderate a discussion between Bruce Hoffman and Peter Bergen, who will explain their differing views on the current threat posed by al-Qaeda and ISIS as well as the successes and challenges of U.S. counterterrorism efforts. Audience members will be invited to ask their own questions following the moderated conversation.

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The Aftermath of Christchurch: Voices and Consequences

Time: 4:00pm – 6:00pm

Location: ACMCU Boardroom ICC #270, Georgetown University – 7th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20007

Information: During Friday prayer on March 15, 2019, worshippers at the Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Islamic Centre suffered a terrorist attack by an avowed white nationalist. Fifty people died in the attack and another forty injured. It was the largest mass shooting in New Zealand’s history. New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern issued the “…strongest possible condemnation of the ideology for those who did this …” She said, “…we utterly reject and condemn…” the attackers. New Zealand, the Prime Minister said, is a place of “… diversity, kindness, compassion, a home for those who share our values, refuge for those who need it.”

The backstory to the unfolding of this tragedy can be found in the ethnic, racial, religious and migration experiences in both New Zealand and Australia, the home of the attacker. Looking to the future the tragedy also marks the start of a new chapter in how both New Zealanders and Australians see themselves.

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Is Africa Rising? Examining Pathways to Security, Peace, and Sustainable Development

Time: 5:30pm – 7:00pm

Location: American University, SIS Building, Abramson Family Founders Room – 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC

Information: Participate in an interdisciplinary conversation on the future of stability and development in Africa. This panel discussion is an opportunity to expand the conversation beyond the economy and trade, into the areas of political stability, security, and the youth bulge in Africa. This panel will be moderated by Fanta Aw and will feature Ambassador John Campbell, Marc Sommers, Moon Oulatta, and Franka Nzounkekang. This event is open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. Contact peace@american.edu with any questions.

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Wednesday, March 27th

Ukraine’s Armed Forces Five Years into Conflict with Russia

Time: 10:00am – 11:30am

Location: CSIS Headquarters, 2nd Floor Conference Center B – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Ukraine’s Armed Forces were in a state of deep crisis at the onset of conflict with Russia in 2014. Over the last 5 years, Ukraine has taken steps to increase the combat readiness of its Armed Forces. Despite limited resources, Ukraine has modernized its existing toolkit and introduced new equipment, including unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), anti-tank guided missiles (ATGM), and tactical-level communications equipment designed to withstand Russian electronic warfare. These developments have chipped away at Ukraine’s power disparity with Russia, but the Ukrainian armed forces still face near and medium-term challenges. Mykola Bielieskov of the Kyiv-based Institute of World Policy will chart the trajectory of the Ukrainian Armed Forces since 2014, its current state, and future prospects with an eye toward Ukraine’s conflict with Russia. Michael Kofman of CNA will provide an overview of Russian tactics and equipment in eastern Ukraine. Jeff Mankoff of CSIS will moderate. 

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Asylum and the Alliance: How the United States and Australia Negotiate Refugee Protection

Time: 12:30pm – 2:00pm

Location: ICC 141, Georgetown University, 3700 O Street NW, Washington, DC 20057

Information: In November 2016, near the end of the Obama administration, the Australian and US governments concluded an agreement that allowed for the transfer of roughly 1,250 refugees held in detention centers located in Nauru and on Papua New Guinea’s Manus Island to the US. In early 2017, President Trump complained calling it a ‘very bad deal’. Yet, the Australia–United States Resettlement Arrangement remains in place. What is the backstory to the agreement, and what has happened since?

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 Human Trafficking in the Western Hemisphere Focusing on Latin America

Time: 4:00pm – 6:00pm

Location: Elliott School of International Affairs, Rm 211 – 1957 E Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

Information: Professor Louise Shelley, Director of the Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center – TraCCC at GMU, will be speaking on Human Trafficking in the Western Hemisphere focusing on Latin America.

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Thursday, March 28th

Perspectives: Women of Color in International Affairs

Time: 9:30am – 11:00am

Location: CSIS Headquarters, 2nd Floor Conference Center C – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Please join the Center for Strategic and International Studies for an inclusive conversation about the experiences of women working in international affairs as well as the significant benefits to the country of fully including women of all backgrounds in foreign policy decision making.

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Thailand’s Elections: What Happened, and What Happens Next?

Time: 9:30am – 11:00am

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: The CSIS Southeast Asia Program is pleased to present “Thailand’s Elections: What Happened, and What Happens Next?” a panel discussion featuring Dr. Prajak Kongkirati, Dr. Allen Hicken, and Ernest Z. Bower. They will discuss the outcomes of Thailand’s March 24 general elections, and what’s next for Thai politics and U.S.-Thailand relations.

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The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction: High-Risk List

Time: 10:00am – 11:00am

Location: CSIS Headquarters, 2nd Floor Conference Center A/B – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: After 17 years and $132 billion appropriated for reconstruction, the United States finds itself at an inflection point in Afghanistan. Afghan security forces are locked in a stalemate with the Taliban on the battlefield, ISIS-K remains a persistent threat, and corruption continues to threaten to fatally undermine the Afghan state. In the midst of this, the United States is currently engaged in negotiations with the Taliban about a possible end to the conflict. Join us at CSIS on Thursday, March 28th at 10am as Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR), John F. Sopko, unveils SIGAR’s latest high-risk list for Congress. The High-Risk List will call attention to the greatest threats facing U.S. reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan, including those that may arise if a peace agreement is reached. Mr. Sopko will then join Dr. Anthony H. Cordesman and Dr. Seth G. Jones for a discussion of the report’s findings.

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Beyond Brexit: A Conversation with The Hon. Dan Mulhall, Ambassador of Ireland to the U.S.

Time: 10:00am – 11:30am

Location: Elliott School of International Affairs, Voesar Conf. Room, Suite 412 – 1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

Information: In the lead-up to Brexit, political debate in Britain has been dominated by the notion of ‘‘backstop’’ – the British Government’s commitment that, whatever the UK’s future relationship with the EU, it will not impose a hard border on the island of Ireland. As Taoiseach Leo Varadkar reaffirmed when meeting President Trump on March 14, Ireland has always been clear that Brexit posed serious risks for the Northern Ireland peace process, risks the backstop is ultimately designed to address. At the same time, Ireland is also the one EU member state set to be most adversely impacted economically by Brexit. The focus on these threats has, to some extent, drawn international attention from other major developments in Ireland – its remarkable economic recovery from the Euro crisis; sweeping social change exemplified in recent referenda on abortion and marriage equality; and, on the centenary of its independence, the state’s firm commitment to global engagement. To consider all of these and to reflect on Ireland’s role in transatlantic relations post-Brexit, please join us for a discussion with The Honorable, Dan Mulhall, Ambassador of Ireland to the U.S. Daniel Mulhall was born and brought up in Waterford. He pursued his graduate and postgraduate studies at University College Cork where he specialised in modern Irish history and literature. He took up duty as Ireland’s 18th Ambassador to the United States in August 2017. He joined the Department of Foreign Affairs in 1978 and had his early diplomatic assignments in New Delhi, Vienna (OSCE), Brussels (European Union) and Edinburgh where he was Ireland’s first Consul General, 1998-2001. He served as Ireland’s Ambassador to Malaysia (2001-05), where he was also accredited to Laos, Thailand and Vietnam. From 2009 to 2013, he was Ireland’s Ambassador to Germany. Before arriving in Washington, he served as Ireland’s Ambassador in London (2013-17). Ambassador Mulhall maintains a keen interest in Irish history and literature. He is the author of A New Day Dawning: A Portrait of Ireland in 1900 (Cork, 1999) and co-editor of The Shaping of Modern Ireland: A Centenary Assessment (Dublin, 2016). A keen advocate of public diplomacy, Ambassador Mulhall makes regular use of social media in order to provide insights into the work of the Embassy, to promote all things Irish and to engage with Irish people and those of Irish descent around the world. He provides daily updates on his Twitter account @DanMulhall and posts regular blogs on the Embassy’s website

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Constraining Iraq’s nuclear and missile capabilities

Time: 2:00pm – 3:30pm

Location: The Brookings Institution, Falk Auditorium, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20036

Information: The Trump administration’s “maximum pressure campaign” is putting Iran under great stress, but it is unlikely to compel Tehran to accept its far-reaching demands. The United States needs a new strategy for constraining Iran’s future nuclear capabilities as well as its missile program. Two new Brookings monographs—“Constraining Iran’s Future Nuclear Capabilities” by Robert Einhorn and Richard Nephew, and “Constraining Iran’s Missile Program” by Robert Einhorn and Vann Van Diepen—provide recommendations for addressing the challenges to regional and international security posed by Iran’s nuclear and missile programs. On Thursday, March 28, the Foreign Policy program at Brookings will hold a public event where the authors—Einhorn, Nephew, and Van Diepen—will summarize the reports’ principal findings and recommendations, and Brookings Senior Fellow Suzanne Maloney will provide commentary. After their discussion, the panelists will take audience questions.

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Friday, March 29th

Examining the Future of the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue

Time: 8:30am – 12:00pm

Location: CSIS Headquarters – 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Information: Please join the CSIS Alliances and American Leadership Program for a half-day conference on the possible future trajectory of the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue (Quad) on March 29th. Alliances Program Fellow Patrick Gerard Buchan will discuss the results of a survey of regional strategic elites on the future of the Quad with Senior Vice President for Asia Dr. Michael Green. An opening discussion on strategic challenges in the Indo-Pacific will frame two-panel discussions with regional experts on opportunities for Quad collaboration on security and infrastructure development. Please register your attendance at the link below.

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The Future of America’s Allies in Northeast Asia

Time: 9:15am – 10:45am

Location: Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C. Headquarters, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004

Information: Hudson Institute will host a conversation on the future of U.S. alliances with Japan and the Republic of Korea. America cannot take for granted its cornerstone alliances in Northeast Asia. Decades of success guarantees neither the longevity nor the compatibility of the U.S.-Japan and U.S.-ROK alliances. Between Japan’s concern about a more assertive China and South Korea’s focus on inter-Korean rapprochement, history, politics, and even military operations can disrupt cooperation between two of America’s sturdiest allies. Moreover, U.S. disagreements with South Korea and Japan over burden-sharing, basing, or trade imbalances can reinforce regional perceptions that “America First” implies retrenchment and the handling of alliances more on a transactional than a strategic basis. Panelists include retired Admiral Scott Swift, General Walter ‘Skip’ Sharp, and former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Christine Wormuth. The conversation will be moderated by The Daily Beast’s Kimberly Dozier with an introduction by Hudson’s Patrick Cronin.

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 The Demography of Ukraine: Ukraine in an Election Year

Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004

Information: The last national census of Ukraine was conducted nearly 20 years ago. Recent attempts to conduct a new census since have been postponed. Complicating the issue, events in Ukraine such as Russia’s annexation of Crimea and the war in the East have led to dramatic demographic changes that remain unaccounted for in official statistics. Professor Ella Libanova, Director of the Ptoukha Institute for Demography and Social Studies of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, will offer an analysis of Ukraine’s current demographic situation as well as predictions for where the country’s demography is headed on the eve of the 2019 presidential election.

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 A New Parliament in Iraq: A Conversation with Speaker Mohammed al-Halbous

Time: 11:30am – 12:30pm

Location: U.S. Institute of Peace, Middle East and Africa Center – 2301 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20037

Information: Iraq’s competitive 2018 parliamentary elections were characterized by unexpected new coalitions, shifting alliances, and a politically charged government formation. The continuing threat of ISIS, as well as sustained popular protest in Basra, deep economic issues, and unresolved tensions with the Kurdistan Regional Government, are only a few items on the long list of vexing problems facing the country’s new leadership. On March 29, we will speak with Iraq’s new speaker of the Council of Representatives, Mohammed al-Halbousi, about the newly formed parliament’s priorities, the ongoing battle against violent extremism, and his vision for peace and stability.

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Diverse Diplomacy Leaders series with Ambassador James Irwin Gadsden

Time: 2:00pm – 3:30pm

Location: McGhee Library, Georgetown University

Information: Ambassador (ret.) James Irwin Gadsden is a former Senior Career Foreign Service Officer and former Senior Counselor for International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey. Before joining the Foundation, he was a Diplomat-in-Residence and Lecturer at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs where he continues to direct the Junior Summer Institute for non-Princeton undergraduates who aspire to complete graduate work and careers in international affairs. 

In 2007, Gadsden was Senior Advisor for European Affairs at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations. His assignments prior to that included Deputy to the Commandant and International Affairs Advisor at the National War College (NWC), Senior Advisor for European Affairs at the US Mission to the UN, and Deputy Commandant and International Affairs Advisor at the NWC. He joined the NWC faculty in 2005, after completing three years as US Ambassador to Iceland. Previously, he was Deputy Chief of Mission at the US Embassy in Budapest, Counselor for Economic Affairs at the US Embassy in Paris, economic/political officer at the US Mission to the European Communities in Brussels, and European Communities desk officer at the State Department. Ambassador Gadsden was a member of the ISD Board of Advisers from 2015-2019. He earned a BA degree in economics from Harvard University and an MA degree in East Asian Studies from Stanford University. 

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