International Affairs Events

January 18 – January 22

One of the greatest advantages of living in Washington, DC is having unparalleled access to high-quality events hosted by the nation’s leading public, private, and non-profit organizations. In today’s changed world, these organizations have pivoted to hosting high-quality virtual events, accessible to all.
 
The “Getting Downtown” newsletter is a curated list of events that might be of interest for international affairs-focused students and young professionals.  Please, feel free to share this list of events with anyone that may be interested and subscribe here to continue getting weekly lists of events!

I encourage all of you to virtually attend these events and panel discussions as much as you can. These events are thought-provoking and also provide great opportunities to connect with senior and mid-level professionals.

All the best,
Dr. Paul R. Williams
Rebecca I. Grazier Professor of Law and International Relations
American University
www.drpaulrwilliams.com

Monday, January 18th

Sensitivity Analyses in Poverty Measurement: The Case of the Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Time: 10-11:30 am EST
Location: Hosted online by George Washington University
Information: 
This event examines the following paper: Sensitivity Analyses in Poverty Measurement: The Case of the Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

This paper provides an extensive sensitivity analyses of the global multidimensional poverty index (MPI), a counting-based measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. Empirically, the paper probes the sensitivity of poverty measures and comparisons to modifications in key parameters. Outcomes studied include the adjusted headcount and headcount ratios and their subnational rankings, as well as the exact set of people who are identified as poor. The parameters that are adjusted include the poverty cutoff, weights or deprivation values, and indicators. 

Broadly speaking, the results suggest that parameter choices can make a difference, which is consistent with the fact that often dominance results may not emerge. Specifically, the evidence suggests that fundamentally different parameters may substantially change the performance of the entire poverty measure or even its very nature (e.g., for a union cutoff or extreme weighting schemes). However, the results also suggest little sensitivity of outcomes when changing parameters within plausible ranges.

This event is co-sponsored with OPHI
RSVP: Click Here


Tuesday, January 19th

Carnegie Connects – The Biden Inheritance: U.S. Domestic and Foreign Policy in 2021

Time: 10-11 am EST
Location: Hosted online by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Information: 
On January 20 Joseph R. Biden will become the 46th President of United States, inheriting a set of domestic challenges more acute than any President since Franklin D. Roosevelt. Abroad, the new president will confront a formidable international environment marked by global challenges and powers large and small willing and able to test U.S interests and influence. In the face of a surging pandemic, a fundamentally divided polity, and a battered image abroad, what is a realistic agenda for 2021? And how will a new Administration prioritize the challenges it faces?
 
Join us as Dan Balz, George Packer, and Danielle Pletka sit down with Aaron David Miller to discuss these as other issues.  
RSVP: Click Here


Principled Leadership in Time of Crisis

Time: 1-2 pm EST
Location: Hosted online by George Washington University
Information: 
Former Elliott School Dean Reuben Brigety will discuss the life and experience of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and its meaning for students of international affairs.  International events — including anti-colonial movements in Africa and Gandhi’s peaceful protests against British rule — shaped Dr. King, who in turn has inspired human freedom movements for the past half-century.  Dean Brigety will explore Dr. King’s example of moral leadership.
RSVP: Click Here


Defiance and Democracy: Understanding the Thai Protest Movement

Time: 10-11 am EST
Location: Hosted online by the United States Institute of Peace
Information: 
In 2020, a youth-based protest movement swept Thailand, with protestors calling for fundamental reforms to the Kingdom’s politics. While their key demands—a new election, a new constitution, and reforms to the monarchy—have not been met, the protestors have already succeeded in changing the terms of the national political debate that had persisted over the last two decades. With pledges to return to the streets in the new year with more force, the protests show no signs of stopping, and the endgame remains more uncertain than ever.
RSVP: Click Here


 

Thursday, January 21st

The U.S.-EU Relationship in 2021 and Beyond – What Can We Expect From the Biden Administration?

Time: 9-10 am EST
Location: Hosted online by the German Marshall Fund
Information: 
With President-elect Biden set to take office at 12:01 p.m. on January 20th, Europe is intently focused on rebuilding a relationship with the new administration. The Egmont Royal Institute for International Relations and the German Marshall Fund of the United States will bring together leading European and U.S. experts and policymakers the day after inauguration to analyze what the two allies can expect from each other in the coming years. The conversation will explore what U.S. foreign policy will look like under a Biden administration. Can the U.S.-European relationship be strengthened again? What issues can we see more collaboration on, and where do challenges still exist? Will we see a resurgence of transatlantic engagement?
RSVP: Click Here


U.S.-Pakistan Relations in the Biden Era: A Conversation with Moeed Yusuf

Time: 9-10 am EST
Location: Hosted online by the Wilson Center
Information: 
After a tense period during the first part of the Trump administration, U.S.-Pakistan relations have improved over the last few years amid the launch of a peace and reconciliation process in Afghanistan. However, with U.S. troops drawing down, the future of U.S. relations with Pakistan-which in Washington have long been viewed through the lens of Afghanistan-is uncertain. This online-only event will feature a discussion with Dr. Moeed Yusuf, Pakistan’s national security advisor and special assistant to the prime minister on national security and strategic policy planning. He will discuss Islamabad’s expectations for U.S.-Pakistan relations in the Joe Biden era, and what the situation in Afghanistan may mean for the relationship moving forward. 
RSVP: Click Here


The Shadow Pandemic: How COVID-19 Erodes the Rights of Women and Girls

Time: 10-11 am EST
Location: Hosted online by the Center for Strategic & International Studies
Information: 
Please join the Center for Strategic and International Studies Human Rights Initiative for a discussion of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the rights of women and girls.    

Women and girls have experienced a “shadow pandemic” during the course of and as a result of COVID-19; gains for girls have begun to quickly dissipate, and with rising poverty, rates of forced marriage, child rape, and transactional sex have increased. The erosion of opportunities and rights for girls – if left unaddressed – will continue into a post-COVID world. Already at “epidemic proportions” pre-pandemic, gender-based violence is surging as a major but underreported issue. Moreover, setbacks in girls’ education will have long-term impact on women’s progress, especially in the developing world. Decades of progress and trillions in dollars of economic growth will be lost as a result of this shadow pandemic. The panel will consider not only the scope and nuances of COVID-19’s effects on women and girls but also specific and urgent policy recommendations to address the shadow pandemic.
RSVP: Click Here


Friday, January 22nd

Diagnosing and Addressing India’s Post-2011 Growth Slowdown

Time: 8:30-10 am EST
Location: Hosted online by George Washington University
Information: 
India’s GDP has crashed in 2020 due to the pandemic – but it was showing a decline even before that. Private investment surged in India from 2003 to 2012, and has declined thereafter. In 2020 rupees, the stock of under implementation private projects has dropped from Rs.83 trillion in 2012 to Rs.35 trillion today. The most important puzzle in Indian economics today consists of diagnosing and addressing the disenchantment of the private sector, the change in conditions when compared with the high growth of the 1991-2011 period. Most GDP growth, and almost all jobs, are made when private persons choose to invest in building firms. What happened to the promise? Where have we faltered? How do we change course? How do we overcome the dangers of the middle-income trap and get rich before we grow old? What do we need to do to make our tryst with destiny? This requires going back to first principles, in public economics and public administration, to rethink the foundations of public policy in India, to rethink the concept of the Indian state and its engagement with private persons. Vijay Kelkar and Ajay Shah wrote an ambitious book, “In service of the republic: The art and science of economic policy”, around these questions. It was recently chosen as one of the Best books of 2020 by Bloomberg.
RSVP: Click Here


2021 Carnegie International Nuclear Policy Conference

Time: Register for a schedule of events
Location: Hosted online by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Information: 
In 2021, the Carnegie International Nuclear Policy Conference will be going virtual! Join experts and officials from around the world to debate—and explore solutions for—the most pressing challenges in nuclear nonproliferation, arms control, disarmament, deterrence, energy, and security.
RSVP: Click Here