International Affairs Events

October 19 – October 23

One of the greatest advantages of living in Washington, DC is having unparalleled access to high-quality events hosted by the nation’s leading public, private, and non-profit organizations. In today’s changed world, these organizations have pivoted to hosting high-quality virtual events, accessible to all.

The “Getting Downtown” newsletter is a curated list of events that might be of interest for international affairs-focused students and young professionals.  Please, feel free to share this list of events with anyone that may be interested and subscribe here to continue getting weekly lists of events!

I encourage all of you to virtually attend these events and panel discussions as much as you can. These events are thought-provoking and also provide great opportunities to connect with senior and mid-level professionals.

All the best,
Dr. Paul R. Williams
Rebecca I. Grazier Professor of Law and International Relations
American University
www.drpaulrwilliams.com

Monday, October 19

25 Years: Israel-US Relations Since Rabin

Time: 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM EDT
Location: Hosted Online by American University SIS
Information:
In commemoration of the 25th anniversary of Yitzhak Rabin’s assassination, American University’s School of International Service (SIS) and AU’s Center for Israel Studies (CIS) are hosting an enlightening panel discussion around Israel-US relations. SIS Professor Guy Ziv will moderate a conversation with Ambassador Itamar Rabinovich and Ambassador Dennis Ross, both who knew Rabin well. The discussion will focus on Rabin’s legacy in the context of US-Israel relations and discuss what those relations may look like after the US presidential election in November.
RSVP: Click Here


Legacy and Lessons of the Arab Spring at Ten: A conversation in Honor of Malcolm H. Kerr

Time: 11:30 AM – 11:30 AM EDT
Location: Hosted online by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Information:
The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is pleased to announce the renaming of the Carnegie Middle East Center to the Malcolm H. Kerr Carnegie Middle East Center. To celebrate this important moment and to honor the legacy of Malcolm Kerr, we invite you to join us for a discussion on the future of the Middle East.

The event will feature remarks by William J. Burns, Ann Kerr, and Maha Yahya, followed by a conversation between Jihad Azour, Marwan Muasher, Ben Rhodes, and Christiane Amanpour looking toward the ten-year anniversary of the Arab Spring.
RSVP: Click Here


China’s Eight Deadly Sins in Trade Policy: A Conversation with Peter Navarro

Time: 11 AM EDT
Location: Hosted online by the Hudson Institute
Information:
Join Hudson Institute for a conversation with Assistant to the President and Director of the Office for Trade and Manufacturing Peter Navarro, who will discuss the status and lessons learned from the ongoing U.S.-China trade negotiations. Hudson Senior Fellow and Director for Chinese Strategy Michael Pillsbury will moderate the conversation.

As White House trade adviser, Dr. Navarro has been at the forefront of U.S.-China trade negotiations over the past two years. As the trade deal nears completion, Dr. Navarro’s efforts have helped expose the unfair trade practices and economic espionage regularly committed under the direction of the Chinese Communist Party, while working towards a more equitable agreement between the two nations.

Dr. Navarro will deliver a speech on his observations and join Dr. Pillsbury for a discussion on what a second phase of talks might look like with a new American administration on the horizon. Dr. Navarro’s previous statements on China have been included in the Hudson Institute report A Guide to the Trump Administration’s China Policy Statements, edited by Dr. Pillsbury.
RSVP: Click Here


Tuesday, October 20

Iran and the US – A Critical Juncture: Fireside Chat with Ariane Tabatabai

Time: 12 – 1 PM EDT
Location: Hosted online by Johns Hopkins SAIS
Information:
Join Johns Hopkins SAIS’ Rethinking Iran for a moderated conversation between Ariane Tabatabai and Vali Nasr on the future of U.S.-Iran relations ahead of the November election.

Ariane M. Tabatabai is the Middle East Fellow at the Alliance for Securing Democracy at the German Marshall Fund of the United States and an adjunct senior research scholar at the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA).

Vali Nasr is the Majid Khadduri Professor of Middle East Studies and International Affairs at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).

The last four years have put an unparalleled strain on the already tenuous relations between Washington and Tehran. The U.S. withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal in 2018, hardening U.S. sanctions on Iran, and the assassination of Iranian Major General Qassim Soleimani by the United States in January 2020, have made it hard to envision whether and how the growing tensions of this era will dissipate.

This event is part of Rethinking Iran – Johns Hopkins SAIS’ ongoing programming on the theme of “Iran and the US: A Critical Juncture,” which will include fireside chats, policy forums, and roundtable discussions.
RSVP: Click Here


Leaps of Faith: A Conversation

Time: 5 – 6 PM EDT
Location: Hosted online by Johns Hopkins SAIS
Information:
Join us for a conversation with M. Osman Siddique, who is America’s first serving Muslim ambassador and chief of mission. In this discussion, we explore Ambassador Siddique’s new memoir “Leaps of Faith” in which he recounts, his journey to the American Dream- a journey that took him from his childhood in Bangladesh to a successful career as an entrepreneur in the United States, and then representing the country as U.S. ambassador to Fiji, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. Dean Eliot A. Cohen to give opening remarks.
RSVP: Click Here


Women Transforming Peace: Celebrating 20 Years of UNSCR 1325 and Beyond

Time: Hosted online by the United States Institute of Peace
Location: 10 AM – 11:30 AM EST
Information:
Twenty years ago, the U.N. Security Council sparked a global policy revolution when it recognized, for the first time, the unique experiences of women and girls in violent conflict. Resolution 1325, otherwise known as the Women, Peace, and Security agenda, laid a foundation for governments and civil society to place women at the center of peace processes—not only as victims, but as essential builders of peace. However, despite national action plans and legislation in 84 countries, women remain undervalued in peacebuilding and underrepresented in peace processes. Policymakers and practitioners must look beyond this policy framework first established two decades ago to achieve women’s meaningful participation in peace and security moving forward.

Join USIP and the U.S. Civil Society Working Group on Women, Peace and Security to mark the 20th anniversary of U.N. Security Council Resolution 1325. The discussion will look at how countries are expanding on the Women, Peace and Security agenda by adopting feminist foreign and development policies—and how civil society organizations have invested in masculinities programming as a complementary approach. These and other frameworks may prove more effective in advancing gender equality in peace and security, especially in light of the challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic.
RSVP: Click Here


Wednesday, October 21

Societal Resilience in Europe’s Southern Neighborhood

Time: 4 – 5 PM CEST
Location: Hosted online by Carnegie Europe
Information:
Europe’s Southern neighborhood is in turmoil. Libya is engulfed in civil war, Egypt faces growing anti-government protests, and Lebanon is mired in a deep, multifaceted crisis. The war in Syria nears its endgame with the Assad regime still in power, and the normalization of ties between Israel and some Gulf states—while historic—is unlikely to advance Israeli-Palestinian peace.

The region’s societal struggles, historic animosities, and religious confrontations—not to mention the coronavirus pandemic and the uncertain prospects facing youths—could threaten Europe’s security.

Join Mark DaouPol MorillasSaime Özçürümez, and Maha Yahya for a discussion about the elements needed to strengthen societal resilience and manage the plethora of challenges in Europe’s Southern neighborhood. Judy Dempsey will moderate.
RSVP: Click Here


CSIS Press Briefing: U.S. Policy Toward Taiwan

Time: 10-1 AM EDT
Location: Hosted online by CSIS
Information:
The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) will host a press briefing over Zoom on Wednesday, October 21 at 10:00 a.m. to discuss U.S.-Taiwan relations.

CSIS experts Michael J. Green and Bonnie S. Glaser will discuss the findings of an upcoming Task Force report on U.S. policy toward Taiwan. They will also address how U.S. policy toward Taiwan could shift after the November presidential election and how U.S. support for Taiwan fits into the larger competition with China.

Please email Andrew Schwartz at aschwartz@csis.org to register.
RSVP: Click Here


International Security at the Nuclear Nexus (Day 1)

Time: 12 – 5:15 PM EDT
Location: Hosted online by CSIS
Information:
In today’s competitive security landscape, nuclear weapons cannot be examined in isolation from other strategic security challenges. Current and emerging challenges related to nuclear weapons increasingly cross-cut other domains, including cyber, space, and conventional war. The International Security at the Nuclear Nexus virtual conference will include panel discussions spread out over two days and draw upon the analysis produced by the PONI International Security at the Nuclear Nexus article series, which will feature medium length analysis pieces and related media examining issues that intersect nuclear weapons and other international security issue areas.

Nuclear weapons issues lie at the heart of a wide range of national and international security subject areas, such as conventional/nuclear integration as well as machine learning and artificial intelligence, cyber and space. The conference panels will go beyond the immediate nuclear community, bringing diverse subject matter expertise into the nuclear world. Panels will include some scholars from within the CSIS International Security Program and outside specialists while also featuring a keynote address.
RSVP: Click Here


Thursday, October 22

SIS Global to Local: Climate Justice

Time: 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM EDT
Location: Hosted online by American University SIS
Information:
Climate change is one of the biggest threats our world is facing today, mainly because it has so many different impacts. Ice caps are melting and causing sea levels to rise. Grasslands are becoming deserts while other regions experience extreme floods. Mass extinctions of both animal and plant species are occurring. And of course people are impacted, too.

This panel discussion is about the issue of climate justice: the idea that those who are least responsible for climate change suffer its gravest consequences. Our panelists will discuss the fact that climate change is an important ethical and political concern, not just a purely environmental or physical one. Problems regarding climate justice can be seen here in Washington, DC as well as around the US and the world. These experts will discuss these concerns and share possible solutions and actions that individuals can take to make a difference.
RSVP: Click Here


Turkey’s Energy Policy and the Prospects for EU-Turkey Cooperation

Time: 9-10:30 AM EDT
Location: Hosted online by the German Marshall Fund
Information:
Turkey has the highest growing rate of energy demand among the OECD countries. Consequently, Turkey’s main energy policy priority is to secure its energy supply and meet the demand to sustain its economic growth as its population grows. Being a resource-poor country, energy security has always been one of Ankara’s priorities, therefore, energy has been the key pillar of Turkey’s conceptualization of its interests in this geographical area and policy vis-à-vis the countries of the region. Moreover, diversifying its supplies and becoming a regional energy corridor have been one of the main objectives of Turkey’s energy agenda. It seems that Turkey’s gas imports shift away from Russia, toward U.S. lately. Strong mutual interest and Turkey’s geographical position in ensuring energy security in Europe, has also positioned energy to be an important agenda item in Turkey-EU relations. How is Turkish energy policy evolving? In this complicated political context, can the EU-Turkey energy relationship still be seen as one of the few components of the positive EU-Turkey agenda?

This discussion aims to examine the developments of Turkish energy policy and propose new strategies for Turkey-EU cooperation in the energy domain.

This online event is part of a series of events and analyses organized as part of the GMF-TOBB Fellowship on Turkey, Europe, and Global Issues launched by GMF in partnership with the Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges of Turkey (TOBB) in 2017.
RSVP: Click Here


Arms Control and Strategic Stability: Chinese Perspectives

Time: 8 – 9 AM EDT
Location: Hosted online by Brookings
Information:
In 2019, the Trump administration announced that it was seeking to develop a new arms control framework to replace the New START Treaty with Russia. A key objective of the administration’s approach was to include China, which has been expanding its nuclear arsenal, in any future treaty, as per the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency’s assessment that “China is likely to at least double the size of its nuclear stockpile.” Likewise, China is developing other military technologies of concern to the United States and its allies, including medium-and intermediate-range ballistic missiles, anti-satellite weapons, and offensive cyber capabilities. However, to date, China has explicitly rejected calls to join U.S.-Russia arms control negotiations. Therefore, what are the prospects for eventually bringing China into a future arms control framework?

On Thursday, October 22, the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution will host an online discussion on these issues with Major General (ret.) Yao Yunzhu, Professor Li Bin, and Brookings Fellows Frank Rose and Lindsey Ford.
RSVP: Click Here


Friday, October 23

Up Close: A Conversation with Georgian Parliamentarians on the Eve of Election

Time: 8:30 – 10 AM EDT
Location: Hosted online by the German Marshall Fund
Information:
Please join the German Marshall Fund of the United States’ Frontlines of Democracy Initiative in cooperation with the Rondeli Foundation on October 23 for a special conversation with representatives from several of Georgia’s leading political parties a week before October 31 parliamentary elections. The Georgian election is taking place at a time of heightened domestic and regional economic, political, and security challenges. Participants will discuss key pre-election issues and policy priorities, including reforms, from the perspective of their parties and the Georgian public. They will discuss these challenges, both domestic and foreign policies, and the issues that will impact Georgia’s democratic and Euro-Atlantic trajectory after the election.
RSVP: Click Here


Tackling the Pandemic in Situations of Fragility, COnflict, and Violence

Time: 10 – 11 AM EDT
Location: Hosted online by CSIS
Information:
Fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV) pose critical development challenges. By 2030, up to two-thirds of the world’s extreme poor will live in fragile and conflict-affected countries, threatening efforts to end extreme poverty and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In recent years we have seen more violent conflicts globally than at any time in the past 30 years, and 79.5 million people have been forcibly displaced by conflict and violence worldwide. FCV therefore has a significant destabilizing impact, and takes a huge toll on human capital, creating vicious cycles that reduce people’s lifetime productivity, earnings and socioeconomic mobility. The Covid-19 crisis has exacerbated these challenges and caused significant health and economic harm to those living in FCV settings, threatening to further hinder stability and progress over the longer-term. This event will address how the international community can work together to (1) mitigate the impact of the pandemic on existing drivers of fragility and conflict through enhanced stabilization efforts, (2) support the most vulnerable, (3) better coordinate bilateral and multilateral responses to Covid-19 in fragile contexts, and (4) rebuild societies and economies post pandemic.
RSVP: Click Here