International Affairs Events

April 26 – April 30

One of the greatest advantages of living in Washington, DC is having unparalleled access to high-quality events hosted by the nation’s leading public, private, and non-profit organizations. In today’s changed world, these organizations have pivoted to hosting high-quality virtual events, accessible to all.
 
The “Getting Downtown” newsletter is a curated list of events that might be of interest for international affairs-focused students and young professionals. Please, feel free to share this list of events with anyone that may be interested and subscribe here to continue getting weekly lists of events!

I encourage all of you to virtually attend these events and panel discussions as much as you can. These events are thought-provoking and also provide great opportunities to connect with senior and mid-level professionals.

All the best,
Dr. Paul R. Williams
Rebecca I. Grazier Professor of Law and International Relations
American University
www.drpaulrwilliams.com

Monday, April 26

The Policy and Advocacy Use of Multidimensional Poverty Measures

Time: 10 – 11:15 am EDT
Location: Hosted online George Washington University
Information: 
Multidimensional poverty measures are being used increasingly widely, and indeed included in the Sustainable Development Goals which require countries to reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions by 2030. Despite this increased prominence and adoption of multidimensional poverty measures both at the global and national level – including by UNICEF country offices, there have been few if any comprehensive assessments on the policy and programme use of multidimensional poverty measures.

The talk, and the paper behind it, aims to address this knowledge gap to understand how in practice multidimensional poverty measures – with a focus on child poverty – have been used to guide policy makers and practitioners towards poverty reduction. Accordingly, rather than focus on possible or conceptual pathways of impact, the work intends to review real world examples of how measures have been used to better understand their potential and their limits.
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Vulnerability and Resilience: The Future of East Asian Supply Chains

Time: 8 – 9:15 pm EDT
Location: Hosted online by Brookings
Information: 
Global supply chains have powered East Asia’s economic growth for decades. Trade and investment liberalization and moderate interstate competition made possible shared production networks that stretch across national borders. While extended production networks have long had to contend with localized political risks and natural disasters, the risks to the supply chain model of economic growth are now broader and more sustained. Resurgent great power competition as well as economic nationalism in the form of tariffs, tech restrictions, and reshoring pressures have challenged the foundations of these networks. What are the sources of vulnerability and resilience for production networks in this new geostrategic environment? How will the region’s supply chains adapt?

On April 26, the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution will host a panel of experts to analyze this critical juncture for East Asia’s supply chains and share insights derived from the experiences of Japanese and Taiwanese supply chains in adjusting to this new reality.
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Supporting Sustainable Development in the Arctic: Estonia’s Role in Advancing Arctic Collaboration

Time: 10 – 11 am EDT
Location: Hosted online by the Wilson Center
Information: 
Estonia, a close neighbor of the Arctic applying for Observer status in the Arctic Council, is committed to mitigating the impacts of climate change and advancing sustainable development in the Arctic.

This discussion will offer an exchange of views by experts from the United States and Estonia on ways to promote collaboration to address the critical issues facing the Arctic, especially in the areas of research, environmental protection, and sustainable development.
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Tuesday, April 27

Security Around the World | Fabiana Perera on Security in Venezuela

Time: 12 – 1 pm EDT
Location: Hosted online by Georgetown University
Information: 
Join the Center for Security Studies for a discussion with researcher and professor Fabiana Sofia Perera on the political, economic, and security situation in Venezuela.

This event is part of CSS’s spring series on Security Around the World and is open only to the Georgetown community, not to members of the public. Registration is required in order to attend. For requests for accommodations such as closed captioning due to a disability or medical condition, contact sspmediafellow@georgetown.edu no later than Friday, April 23. A good faith effort will be made to fulfill all accommodation requests.
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The U.S. and Taiwan after COVID: Preparing for the Next Crisis

Time: 10 – 11 am EDT
Location: Hosted online by the Carnegie Endowment
Information: 
For nearly two decades Taiwan and the United States have battled an escalating series of public health crises, from SARS to COVID-19. And since COVID-19 is unlikely to be the last such crisis, public health should be an arena for growing U.S.-Taiwan cooperation. What can be learned from their recent experiences with pandemic preparedness and the use of technology to support public health? How can public and private players in both the United States and Taiwan prepare for the next crisis?

Join us for a conversation featuring Chang-Chuan Chan, Chunhuei Chi, Susan Landau, and J. Stephen Morrison. The Carnegie Endowment’s Evan A. Feigenbaum will moderate.
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The Climate Challenges of South Asia’s Megacities

Time: 9 – 10:30 am EDT
Location: Hosted online by the United States Institute of Peace
Information: 
South Asia is home to over 1.8 billion people, many of whom live in extreme poverty in megacities or urban centers with over 10 million inhabitants. These urban centers are increasingly suffering from the pressures of climate change and contribute immensely to environmental degradation in the region. These environmental stresses exacerbate the dynamics of violent conflict by affecting livelihoods, widening social fissures, and increasing the displacement of communities dependent on natural resources — with religious, ethnic and political minorities at the receiving end of the worst impacts.

Please join USIP for a discussion on the growing stress faced by urban centers in South Asia due to climate change. Experts will discuss how megacities are contributing to environmental degradation and societal conflict, as well as address what policies might best combat these challenges and reflect on President Biden’s latest climate change summit. 
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Wednesday, April 28

Challenges of the Past, Present, and Future: Addressing Asian and Asian American Inclusivity in Academia, Policy, and the Media

Time: 12:15 – 2 pm EDT
Location: Hosted online by George Washington University
Information: 
In advance of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month (May), the GW East Asia National Resource, the GW Institute for Korean Studies, the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, and the Asian Studies Program invite you to join a panel discussion comprised of scholars, experts, and practitioners that will examine critical issues in Asian and Asian American inclusiveness, representation, and equity in the fields of academia, policy research, journalism, and community activism.
RSVP: Click Here


Enhancing U.S.-China Strategic Stability in an Era of Strategic Competition

Time: 9:30 – 10:30 am EDT
Location: Hosted online by the United States Institute of Peace
Information: 
As strategic competition between the United States and China intensifies, the danger of a military confrontation is no longer a far-fetched scenario. Despite recognizing the growing risks of major power conflict, the United States and China have few, if any, effective mechanisms to resolve their differences peacefully. Enhancing strategic stability by lowering the risks of military conflict, preventing a destabilizing arms race, and managing emerging technologies and frontiers of conflict — such as those in space and cyberspace — are now more critical than ever to ensure that the United States and China can compete without disastrous consequences.

Join USIP for the launch of a new report featuring essays from leading American and Chinese security experts on the challenges and opportunities associated with strengthening U.S.-China strategic stability. The event will feature a discussion with six of the report’s authors regarding the perception gaps and drivers of U.S.-China conflict in the nuclear, missile, space, cyber, and emerging technologies realms. The authors will offer recommendations on steps the United States and China can take in the near term to enhance strategic stability.
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Strengthening International Peace and Security

Time: 11 – 12 pm EDT
Location: Hosted online by the German Marshall Fund
Information: 
The German Marshall Fund of the United States would like to invite you to a timely conversation with Helga Schmid, the new secretary general at the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). The conversation, moderated by GMF’s Ian Lesser, will focus on Secretary General Schmid’s priorities in her new capacity at the OSCE. This includes a focus on OSCE efforts to address the far-reaching impacts of COVID-19 and Secretary General Schmid’s vision on how multilateral organizations, including the OSCE, can strengthen peace building, prevent conflict, and empower women and girls.

Representing 57 member countries, the OSCE holds a unique position in the international security architecture. Promoting a comprehensive approach to security that encompasses politico-military, economic and environmental, and human aspects, the organization addresses a wide range of security challenges, including arms control, human rights, democratization, policing strategies, counterterrorism, and economic and environmental activities. 
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Thursday, April 29

Europe in an Era of Growing Sino-American Competition

Time: 10-11:30 am EDT
Location: Hosted online by Johns Hopkins University
Information: 
Join us for a book talk with Sebastian Biba, and Reinhard Wolf, co-editors of “Europe in an Era of Growing Sino-American Competition”, as well as Erik Brattberg, Noah Barkin, Rachel Ellehuus, and Dan Hamilton.
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Shared Worldviews and US-India Relations in the Indo-Pacific and Beyond

Time: 9 – 10:30 am EDT
Location: Hosted online by George Washington University
Information: 
US-India interests and worldviews are presently converging in unprecedented ways in the Indo-Pacific. How are relations between these two democracies evolving for a post-pandemic era in this vital region? What does the first 100 days of the Biden administration tell us?
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Arabic launch | Breaking the Israel-Palestine Status Quo

Time: 12:30 – 16:30 EEST (UTC+3)
Location: Hosted online by the Carnegie Middle East Center
Information: 
After decades of on and off negotiations and failed peace initiatives and as Israel continues to block the emergence of a sovereign and viable Palestinian state, it is time for a shift in U.S. policy toward Palestinian-Israeli peacemaking.

Yet how can this U.S. administration help change the political calculations of Palestinians and Israelis, alter the negative trajectory of realities on the ground, and rebuild prospects for a durable peace?

In a recent paper entitled “Breaking the Israel-Palestine Status Quo,” Marwan Muasher, Zaha Hassan, and Daniel Levy, called for a new U.S. approach to the conflict that prioritizes the rights and human security of Palestinians and Israelis. The paper outlines some of the principal policy options that could be derived from a rights-based approach in addressing the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

Following the launch in English, the Malcolm H. Kerr Carnegie Middle East Center would like to invite you to the regional launching of the Arabic version of the paper.

The launch will include an expert panel discussion hosted by Maha Yahya and featuring Marwan Muasher, co-author of the report, Nur Arafeh and Leila Farsakh.

The panel will be held in Arabic and will take place on Thursday, April 29 from 4:30 until 5:30 p.m. Beirut (9:30 -10:30 a.m. EST). Viewers may submit their questions for the panelists using the Live Chat feature on Facebook and YouTube during the event.
RSVP: Click Here


Friday, April 30

Trends in Governance: Embattled Judiciaries and Political Competition in Eurasia

Time: 10 – 11:30 am EDT
Location: Hosted online by George Washington University
Information: 
The Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia and the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies cordially invite you to “Trends in Governance: Embattled Judiciaries and Political Competition in Eurasia.”
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Globalizing Patient Capital: The Political Economy of Chinese Finance in the Americas

Time: 9 – 10:30 am EDT
Location: Hosted online by George Washington University
Information: 
China’s overseas financing is a distinct form of “patient capital” that marshals the country’s vast domestic resources to create commercial opportunities internationally. Its long-term risk tolerance and lack of policy conditionality has allowed developing economies to sidestep the fiscal austerity tendencies of Western markets and multilaterals. Professor Stephen B. Kaplan will discuss his new book, Globalizing Patient Capital: The Political Economy of Chinese Finance in the Americas, which examines China’s state-led capitalism, and the costs and benefits of state versus market approaches to development. In the talk, Professor Kaplan explores how patient capital affects national-level governance across the Americas and beyond, including how Chinese leaders will react to developing nation’s ongoing struggles with debt and dependency.
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A Conversation with Australian Ambassador Arthur Sinodinos

Time: 12 – 1 pm EDT
Location: Hosted online by the Hudson Institute
Information: 
Join Hudson Institute’s Ravenel B. Curry III Distinguished Fellow Walter Russell Mead and Ambassador Arthur Sinodinos, Australia’s Ambassador to the United States, for a discussion on U.S.-Australia relations and key foreign policy challenges.

How can the free world work together to confront threats ranging from the fallout from COVID-19 to coercion that undermines Indo Pacific security and prosperity and the open rules-based order? Ambassador Sinodinos and Walter Russell Mead will discuss U.S.-Australian cooperation on these and other issues at the next installment of Hudson’s Ambassadors Series.
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